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Id 159
Author García, B.,
Title Urban Regeneration, Arts Programming and Major Events: Glasgow 1990, Sydney 2000 and Barcelona 2004
Reference

García, B. (2004). Urban Regeneration, Arts Programming and Major Events: Glasgow 1990, Sydney 2000 and Barcelona 2004. International Journal of Cultural Policy, 10(1), 103‑118.

Keywords City marketing; Urban regeneration; Cultural tourism; Arts programming; Events; Legacy
Link to article https://doi.org/10.1080/1028663042000212355
Abstract The potential of arts activity as a tool for urban regeneration has been widely discussed since the early 1980s. In parallel, notions of “cultural/urban tourism” and “arts/city marketing” have gained great popularity among marketers, city planners and cultural policy-makers alike. Major events are seen as effective catalysts for city regeneration processes as they are able to merge tourism strategies with urban planning and can boost the confidence of local communities. However, arts programming has yet to achieve a position that allows it to be perceived as a relevant contributor to the success and legacy of large-scale urban events. This article explores the contradiction between the celebrated potential of the arts in urban regeneration processes and their poor position within major events. In so doing, it compares the experiences of three cities, each host to major events with strong arts and cultural components: Glasgow 1990 – European City of Culture; Sydney 2000 – Olympic Games and Olympic Arts Festivals, and Barcelona 2004 – Universal Forum for Cultures.

Metodology The author conducted a review of the literature to study the relationship between arts programming, urban regeneration and major events, and offers an enquiry into the challenges that a common approach may bring to each of these elements and their possible mutual enhancement. The main aim is to explore the existing contradiction between the celebrated potential of the arts as a tool for urban regeneration and their poor position within major events. She also use interviews and case studies to compare the experiences of three cities, each host to major events with strong arts and cultural components: Glasgow 1990 – European City of Culture; Sydney 2000 – Olympic Games and Olympic Arts Festivals, and Barcelona 2004 – Universal Forum for Cultures.

Findings Arts programming can greatly contribute to urban regeneration in the context of a major event hosting process. This has been demonstrated by the experience in Glasgow and, to varying degrees, it was a relevant factor in the successful city image campaigns of Sydney in 2000 and Barcelona from 1992 onwards. However, in these and parallel cases, this contribution has not yet realised its full potential. Current limitations in this process are a lack of coordination among event organisers, tourism bodies, city planners and the arts community. This is partially the result of a tradition of unexplored synergies between popular event activities – including sports competitions and crowd entertainment – and the implementation of arts activities. The latter also implies that mainstream media and the general public are generally unaware of, or do not see, an interest in the arts component of major events.
Open Access NO
DOI DOI: 10.1080/1028663042000212355
Search Database Taylor & Francis
Technique Interview; Literature review
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