CANDIDATE TRANSITION VARIABLES

Candidate transition variables for each document


Article Authors Title Candidate transition variable
View Jermyn, H., The art of inclusion x personal development x social cohesion x community empowerment and self- determination x local image and identity x imagination and vision x health and well being x engaged audiences x sustained audience commitment to the work of projects over an extended period x heightened enjoyment excitement fulfilment and therapeutic release of tensions x skills and knowledge associated with artforms x knowledge of social and cultural issues x personal and social development x creativity and thinking skills study and methodology impact x communication and expressive skills x some effects transferred to other contexts x some effects on school culture and the local community x art itself was an outcome a details are not included in methodology although it is noted that they varied in their formality
View Jermyn, H., The art of inclusion keeping arts safe: protection of children young people and vulnerable adults in arts activities
View Jermyn, H., The art of inclusion evaluating the social impact of participation in arts activities international journal of cultural policy -
View Jermyn, H., The art of inclusion measuring the economic and social impact of the arts
View Jermyn, H., The art of inclusion social inclusion and community development practice
View Kirschner, S., ; Tomasello, M., Joint music making promotes pro-social behavior in 4-year-old children Given that in traditional cultures music making and dancing are often integral parts of important group ceremonies such as initiation rites, weddings or preparations for battle, one hypothesis is that music evolved into a tool that fosters social bonding and group cohesion, ultimately increasing prosocial in-group behavior and cooperation
View Kirschner, S., ; Tomasello, M., Joint music making promotes pro-social behavior in 4-year-old children compared to language which is most effective in mobilizing joint intentionality for goal-directed behavior music might be more efficacious in mobilizing joint intentionality per se in the sense of feeling a we unit thus getting people to experience each other as co-active similar and cooperative members of a group cf
View Beeksma, A., ; Chiara , D., C. Participatory heritage in a gentrifying neighbourhood: Amsterdam’s Van Eesteren Museum as affective space of negotiations a visit to the van eesteren museum is indeed unlike most other museum experiences in that both the indoor museum and the museum apartment have a homey atmosphere that makes them look and feel almost like a community kitchen as conveyed by the initial vignette while the outdoor museum is the neighbourhood itself
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts risks and opportunities of active spectatorship from a manage- ment perspective active spectatorship changes and novelties in the performing arts sector by giuliana ciancio risks and opportunities of active spectatorship from a management perspective
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts the interactive role of participatory creative residences: the artist the venue and the audience perspective creative residencies: how does participation impact on artists venues and participants
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts the focus of urban cultural policies on city centres tended to ignore peripheralb andb inneracityb areasb suaeringb romb amultipleb deprivationab ab ab conceptb that weighs in factors such as income and employment deprivation education skills and training deprivation health deprivation and disability crime barriers to housing and services and living environment deprivation department of communities and local government p
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts the wordb aparticipationab hasb beenb instrumentalizedb onb diab erentb sidesab itb isb necessaryb to rethink about the value of direct participation and on its impact on society and politicsab givenb theb positiveb eab ectb o b participatingb inb culturalb activitiesab artsb andb culture might be the starting point for this discussion initiating and developing forms of participation that promote dialogue and intercultural exchange
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts social interactions are shared perceptions and thoughts in action based on multimodal relations among bodies objects and space
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts breaking the fourth wall: proactive audiences in the performing arts excellence in culture occurs when an experience affects and changes an individual
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts juncker and balling turn to lynn conners concept of late-modern participatory audiences based on seeking entertainment experience feelings passion as well as the opportunity to express an opinion in a public context and participate in through and around the arts event itself conner p
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts as acknowledged above participatory arts engagement can bring great joy to the participants initiate new social relationships get people out of their comfort zones possibly stimulate communities and enhance family bonds
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts audience development co-creation and partici- patory practices have a significant role in the identity-building process of cultural organisations or institutions and represent a form of legitimacy to re-take a role in a cultural and political context walmsley
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts giving spectators more power and control over what and how they experience became a modus operandi for many organizations as well as opening new channels of communication and interaction to foster a more qualitative dialogue between artists and spectators
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts evenb reducedb tob thisb deanitionab participationb canb describeb diaerentb degreesb andb forms of participants involvement in the creative process and influence on the show productionabdeaningbabascaleabo bparticipationbbasedbonbparticipantasbinuencebcouldb help us to clarify these types of participation
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts depending on the social background of participants some places could imagine developing new cultural actions groups of amateurs participatory programming activitiesabsustainablebpartnershipsbwithbinstitutionsbinbthebneighborhoodaboaeringb spaces and opportunities for participants to continue creating with the support of the venue etc
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts a context that encourages active participation of spectators has the potential to provide artists with useful input in support of their creative work
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts broadly speaking empowering a community can be understood as providing individuals with access to tools and services such as training education and healthcare
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts prosumersb areb participantsb o b ab apeeratoapeerab participatory culture beingbactivelybinvolvedbinbculturalbexchangesabandbabparticipatorybculturebisbaabcultureb with relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement and strong support for creating and sharing creations
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts developing a holistic and long-term digital proposition is an opportunity for using digital to promote public understanding and enjoyment of performing arts and to reinforce audience engagement providing authentic insight to artists: it can breaking the fourth wall: proactive audiences in the performing arts be a strategic win-win approach
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts as a growing number of consumers demand more and more intense multi-sensory and customizable experiences arts groupsbandbitbmorebandbmorebdicultbtobsatis ybeveryonebwithbonebexperienceababrownb b ratzkinab aaaaab pab aaaab theb authorsb alsob considerb thatb aataheb typesb o b kineticb andb social experiences idealized by the younger over-stimulated generation of cultural consumers have diverged substantially from the more conventional experiences idealizedbbybolderbaudiencesabaibidaa engagement: the key factor the word engagement used by the abovementioned authors can be translated into involvement commitment participation etc
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts collaborative marketing also considered that the stakeholders of a performing arts project can turn into a community of interest
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts audience engagement and participation lead to empowerment
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts involving spectatorsb whob areb activelyb engagedb inb diaerentb areasb o b per ormingb artsb activityab demonstrates that the participatory experience brings about multiple benefits in termsbo beaectivebusebo bleisurebtimeabcontributionbtowardsbthebimprovementbo bsocialb reality learning the scenic languages and heritage deeper knowledge of the sector direct knowledge of creators activity etc
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts on the other hand fostering learning of participatory values knowledge and skills among spectators through practices enhancing their level of involvement
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts is it possible to train and empower artists with participatory skills
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts open leadership facilitates and triggers a free exchange of creative energy with external ideas people and projects
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts processes of participation and co-creation have been shown to deepen audience engagement and provide authentic insights to artists
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts enactive audiences require listening learning porous and hosting organisations
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts evaluating the social impact of participation in arts activities
View Bonet, L., ; Négrier, E., Breaking the Fourth Wall. Proactive Audiences in the Performing Arts the components of engagement in virtual heritage environments
View Currid, E., ; Williams, S., Two cities, five industries: Similarities and differences within and between cultural industries in New York and Los Angeles the patterns of cultural industry clustering and location have become increasingly significant in economic develop- ment literature and practice as arts and culture have become central players in the revitalization of urban centers
View Blessi, G.T., ; Tremblay , D., G.; Sandri, M., ; Pilati, T., New trajectories in urban regeneration processes: Cultural capital as source of human and social capital accumulation – Evidence from the case of Tohu in Montreal improve collective processes through participation in cultural activ- ities to foster new forms of sociability and to link social approval and recognition to commitment
View Blessi, G.T., ; Tremblay , D., G.; Sandri, M., ; Pilati, T., New trajectories in urban regeneration processes: Cultural capital as source of human and social capital accumulation – Evidence from the case of Tohu in Montreal the accumulation is deeply rooted in the characteristics of the social environment and sacco and tavano blessi underline sacco & tavano blessi that it depends on whether knowledge and competence are economically and socially rewarded and on whether the social context stimulates people to interact bridge and binds people and communities inspires people to be intellectually engaged and curious and so on
View Blessi, G.T., ; Tremblay , D., G.; Sandri, M., ; Pilati, T., New trajectories in urban regeneration processes: Cultural capital as source of human and social capital accumulation – Evidence from the case of Tohu in Montreal cds and tohu attract artists producers and choreographers and they presently employ people making it one of the most important zones involved in training creation production and dif- fusion of circus arts
View Blessi, G.T., ; Tremblay , D., G.; Sandri, M., ; Pilati, T., New trajectories in urban regeneration processes: Cultural capital as source of human and social capital accumulation – Evidence from the case of Tohu in Montreal to increase the stock of social capital it is necessary for individuals to devote resources eg money time and energy to the creation and circulation of relational and social participation opportunities and culturally mediated social interaction activities that cause the strengthening of social ties
View Blessi, G.T., ; Tremblay , D., G.; Sandri, M., ; Pilati, T., New trajectories in urban regeneration processes: Cultural capital as source of human and social capital accumulation – Evidence from the case of Tohu in Montreal based on the studys ndings it can be argued that the cds and tohu devel- opment has contributed positively to the sc and hc of some respondents through increased social relations and participation increased social networks and acquaintance with others increased employment and education opportunities and increased cultural participation
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. A growing body of research into the social role and impact of museums suggests that engagement with the concepts of social inclusion and exclusion will require museums - and the profession and sector as a whole - to radically rethink their purposes and goals and to renegotiate their relationship to, and role within, society
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. a growing body of research into the social role and impact of museums suggests that engagement with the concepts of social inclusion and exclusion will require museums - and the profession and sector as a whole - to radically rethink their purposes and goals and to renegotiate their relationship to and role within society
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. at a community level museums can act as a catalyst for social regeneration empowering communities to increase their self-determination and develop the confidence and skills to take greater control over their lives and the development of the neighbourhoods in which they live
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. as agents of individual community and societal change museums have demonstrated their potential to contribute towards the combating of issues such as poor health high crime low educational attainment and unemployment
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. a shift towards a more outward looking audience-focused sector is evidenced in a variety of ways; the widespread adoption of the language around inclusion in museum policy increased research activity and increasing attention to the issues through conferences seminars and considerable coverage and debate within the pages of professional journals
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. alongside the pronouncement of new government expectations made explicit in their policy guidance research findings have further fuelled the debate presenting empirical evidence of the impact of museums on disadvantage and social inequality
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. secondly the publicising of museums contributions to inclusion will serve to increase awareness of the social role and contribution of museums both within and outside of the sector to advocate the benefits of an inclusive approach and to reward those achieving within this area through recognition
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. for many this democratisation of the museum and the resultant sharing of power resources skills and knowledge between museum and audience challenges the very notion of the museum professional as expert
View Sandell, R., Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. figure suggests that a virtuous circle of diversity can be created through the adoption and implementation of positive action initiatives in recruitment participatory approaches to collecting and programming and targeted approaches to audience development
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. latest approaches for the management of heritage in landscapes have emphasized the important role of communities in re-accepting responsibility for conservation initiatives veldpaus and roders enabling the preservation of local values through participatory approaches ragozino
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. what is more empirical studies have showed that enhancing sense of place is in turn important for the socially sustainable development of revitalization projects yung and chan ; liu and cheung making it key element for successful heritage projects with place-making elements
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. the review shows that themes such as equity poverty alleviation and livelihoods support are increasingly complemented by more intangible and less measurable concepts such as identity sense of place participation and access social capital social cohesion the benefits of social networks happiness and quality of life polse and stren as in kwan esther yung and wan edwin chan
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. as such it shows a diverse perspective on social sustainability
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. accounting for social cohesion and sense of belonging to community
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. perceptions: sense of belonging to community trust and supportive relationships with other communities and institutions social cohesion social inclusion sense of place -place identity dependency and attachment
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. our research suggests an approach that comprises of four stages connecting data collection and analysis: identify project types participation typologies and map stakeholders community profiling and social needs analysis identify heritage values and assess changes and analyze social impacts and assess significance
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. participants also provided information on perceptions by referring to the specific projects they participated in offering more anchored views about specific heritage sites type of activities learning outcomes and further engagement with the projects
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. they referred repeatedly to heritage as an inspiration for creativity relating it to the rich cultural context of orkney and heritage as a secondary public good pointing out issues of inclusion and accessibility to everyone to benefit in terms of knowledge and personal development
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. perceptions of heritages role for local sustainable development
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. heritage as social benefit -heritage centers as community centers heritage activities as opportunities to deal with mental health cultural institutions as supporting groups for events perceptions of the role and contribution of heritage for socially sustainable development: heritage to support economic development: heritage to support economy based on services and tourism; and heritage to tackle issue of seasonality in interests
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. heritage that can sustain place intersects both with social and economic aspects : heritage promotion as place branding as a destination; heritage interpretation rediscovered personal history and connection with place that sustains population; and heritage protection as natural environment and landscape protection
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. heritage participation: from values to impact variables and developing indicators
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. to capture indirect impacts to livelihoods questions captured also perceptions of the role and contribution of heritage for socially sustainable development referring to interaction of heritage values with sustainable livelihoods covering social sustainability and extending to values stemming from use of heritage outputs
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. a direct impacts individual level: social well-being direct impacts: individual level social well-being become part of a social group belonging social capital bridging and bonding make new friends and socialize fight isolation and increase mental health mental health skills for daily use-recreation increase sense of ownership of place and heritage sense of belonging to place/ sense of identity skills for job market knowledge education and personal development create new professional networks awareness about historic evolution development learn more about heritage-increase excitement self-motivation/self-direction abilities won self-empowerment and confidence find life orientation-goals personal satisfaction and pride for service offered b direct impacts community level social well-being: social cohesion direct impacts: community level social well-being increase inclusion of newcomers in community roles social capital bridging /inclusion increase bonding and empowerment via team work social capital bonding /social cohesion intra-generation links mingle with other island residents social capital linking sense of belonging to community collective empowerment unlock potentials for self-enclosed groups c indirect impacts for wider community of place via use of outputs heritage centers utilized as community centers and poles of interest indirect impacts enhanced sense of belonging to group sustained population by supporting access to place enhanced community and place bonds heritage protection projects accountable to community providing further spatial development opportunities increase sense of ownership through recognition of uniqueness of place/identity the impact nodes were grouped into three core categories reflecting different levels of social impacts: individual-level social well-being: volunteering in heritage was pictured by interviewees as providing self-esteem and sense of duty or life orientation to individuals
View Gallou, E., ; Fouseki, K., Applying Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Principles in Assessing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Social Sustainability. finally the benefits of new entrepreneurial and innovative management models used in heritage like social enterprise or cooperative management see ragozino for local development can be proved and their further application in the sector can be encouraged through the use of sia
View Gainza, X., Culture‑led neighbourhood transformations beyond the revitalisation/gentrification dichotomy. local life changes with the arrival of new residents and retail activity evoking mixed feelings of revitalisation displacement and loss of neighbourhood identity
View Gainza, X., Culture‑led neighbourhood transformations beyond the revitalisation/gentrification dichotomy. artists and cultural entrepreneurs migrate to neighbourhoods that provide the material and symbolic resources that facili- tate creative activity lloyd
View Gainza, X., Culture‑led neighbourhood transformations beyond the revitalisation/gentrification dichotomy. urban social movements and the neighbourhood association have been actively involved
View Gainza, X., Culture‑led neighbourhood transformations beyond the revitalisation/gentrification dichotomy. a group of artists also drew attention to the instrumentalisation of culture and its pervasive effects on local life through an artistic intervention
View Jones, A., L. Regenerating Urban Waterfronts—Creating Better Futures—From Commercial and Leisure Market Places to Cultural Quarters and Innovation Districts. key performance indicators meas- uring degrees of success such as fusion and diversification capacity building the public realm innovation & vision creativity entrepreneurship cultural capital environmental social and economic sustainability connectivity quality leadership integration resilience and social equity have clearly set the agenda and contemporary measurements for success
View Jones, A., L. Regenerating Urban Waterfronts—Creating Better Futures—From Commercial and Leisure Market Places to Cultural Quarters and Innovation Districts. the move toward more culturally orientated approaches to regeneration have involved the development of locally based innovation and cultural strategies in partnership with local municipalities which are increasingly turning to cultural resources and small busi- ness operations to both stimulate new economic activity and to aid physical regeneration of urban environments waterfronts and communities
View Jones, A., L. Regenerating Urban Waterfronts—Creating Better Futures—From Commercial and Leisure Market Places to Cultural Quarters and Innovation Districts. the future success of waterfront regeneration strategies will be increasingly tied to a paradigm which reflects more prescribed development criteria which encourages inclusivity mixed and innovative projects that promote sustainable planning creativity visionary design concepts cultural sensitivity cultural capacity community resilience connectivity entrepreneurship innovation integration and appropriate development scale
View Markusen , A., ; Godwa, A., Arts and Culture in Urban or Regional Planning: A Review and Research Agenda researchers and advocacy bodies have used arts and cul- tural economic impact assessments to support the claim that the arts and cultural sector is an important contributor of jobs output and public sector revenues in a regional economy
View Markusen , A., ; Godwa, A., Arts and Culture in Urban or Regional Planning: A Review and Research Agenda in a study accounting for other factors in local growth and requiring original data collection from city sources sheppard found that mass moca a large new arts center developed in an old textile mill in north adams massachusetts increased nearby property values by about percent evidence of positive neighborhood-level wealth-creating effects
View Markusen , A., ; Godwa, A., Arts and Culture in Urban or Regional Planning: A Review and Research Agenda stern and seifert have theorized that natural cultural districts evolve organically as a result of individual agentsdecisions creators and participants producers and consumersto locate near one another and suggest that minimal cluster- ing and dispersion may be preferable on equity grounds
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L. Measuring the intrinsic impacts of arts attendance The research has yielded a more nuanced, but still emergent, understanding of the emotional, intellectual, social and aesthetic constructs of intrinsic impact, methods of measuring them, and insight into the limitations and applications of this work for policy-makers and arts practitioners
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L. Measuring the intrinsic impacts of arts attendance anecdotal evidence of how arts experiences impact individuals is abundant brown
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L. Measuring the intrinsic impacts of arts attendance aesthetic experience refers to what happens to individuals as they see hear and feel art
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L. Measuring the intrinsic impacts of arts attendance emotional resonance: measures the intensity of emotional response regardless of the nature of the emotion and the degree of empathy with the performers and therapeutic value in an emotional sense; for example: to what extent did you relate to or feel bonded with one or more of the performers
View Jancovich, L., Great art for everyone? Engagement and participation policy in the arts more recently research into the impact of new technology focuses on creative participation and co-creation between artist and viewer through user-generated content which encourages the art of with leadbeater and blurs distinctions between professional and amateur arts
View Jancovich, L., Great art for everyone? Engagement and participation policy in the arts the department of communities and local government dclg aimed to increase public participation through introduction of the duty to involve dclg people in decision-making for all public services
View Walmsley, B., Co-creating theatre: authentic engagement or inter-legitimation? for example holden argues that access to culture is one of the most effective tools for eradicating inequality while others maintain that relinquishing control of a cultural project to participants can increase its relevance and impact arvidsson ; department for culture media and sport
View Walmsley, B., Co-creating theatre: authentic engagement or inter-legitimation? co-creation can provide experiential interactions and encounters which customers perceive as helping them utilize their resources p
View Walmsley, B., Co-creating theatre: authentic engagement or inter-legitimation? according to letman co-creation can also serve a useful purpose for arts organizations in building new communities of practice and preventing theatres taking risks they shouldnt take acting as a control mechanism or early warning signal
View Walmsley, B., Co-creating theatre: authentic engagement or inter-legitimation? co-creation can clearly thrill audiences and deepen their engagement while also providing useful feedback and authentic insights to help artists reflect on and develop their work
View Walmsley, B., Co-creating theatre: authentic engagement or inter-legitimation? the feedback from participants suggests that producers and artists need to be clear and transparent about their objectives engage authentically with participants and explore ways to develop audiences co-creative skills
View Galloway, S., Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts typically empirical studies of the arts attempt to measure the effects on individuals of some type of encounter with the arts testing individuals before and after exposure to an arts experience
View Galloway, S., Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts an example from an arts impact context is michalos investigation of the impact of arts participation on the quality of life of residents in the canadian city of prince george
View Galloway, S., Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts according to this the effects of music on individuals involves the mutual and complex interaction of three major deter- minants of impact identified as the characteristics of the music; the characteristics of the person with reference to the body of research evidence suggesting that people consciously use music to achieve certain psychological states ; and the characteristics of the social situation in which the musical interaction occurs; they refer to a growing literature which shows how specific social and institutional contexts exert a powerful influence on peoples responses to music hargreaves macdonald & miell
View Galloway, S., Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts equipped with this theory researchers have worked with a us-wide network of community arts organizations to develop tools to capture data relating to the theory-relevant dimensions of arts participation and impact
View Galloway, S., Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts realistic evaluation is used by the invest to save: arts in health programme to understand the value and impact of arts participation on the health and well-being of three groups: older people people with mental health needs and health service workers kilroy et al
View Galloway, S., Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts as a partner- ship project it aims to meet a diverse set of stakeholder needs both for evidence of impact health stakeholders and understanding of the transformative effects of arts practice arts stake- holders
View Galloway, S., Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts the outcome of the invest to save study is a proposed model of transformational change demonstrating how outcomes beneficial for health and wellbeing may be possible through the mechanism of arts engagement
View Galloway, S., Theory-based evaluation and the social impact of the arts compared with the traditional experimental or quasiexperimental successionist model a tbe approach provides useful insights into how and why engagement with the arts might effect changes in individuals both positive and negative
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. The study objectives: assess different patterns and experiences of youth involvement in the arts and examine these in relation to demographic characteristics of young people; identify successful and sustained engagement in the arts and evaluate factors which are perceived to inhibit and facilitate it; analyse young peoples attitudes to youth arts participation; highlight perceived need and opportunities in the arts which remain unfulfilled
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. it also created opportunities to rethink curriculum frameworks areas of knowledge and skills and subject constellations
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. businesses trusts and performing companies eg the creation of a new agency into which schools colleges arts practitioner agencies local authorities and rabs pool financial and human resources to establish a service which the participants can buy into as required
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. chamberlain recommends that local arts policies need to be developed and initiated through partnerships with the rabs and other agencies
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. participation was most frequently mentioned in connection with music and the visual arts
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. the figures also show that females have a greater participation rate in swimming and diving whereas music-making and writing songs showed a higher rate of male involvement
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. data on involvement in the detailed categories deemed imaginative or creative for arts: participation show that compared to the - year old group the oldest group had higher rates of participation in playing a musical instrument music-making and writing songs photography writing stories plays and poems sculpture making and other arts such as video-making
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. whatever the age group how can arts funders and providers encourage young people to develop their sporadic dabbling in imaginative or creative activities into fuller and more sustained experiences in arts participation
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. it was more frequent for the primary school arts to be recollected as a contributor to young peoples personal and social development: notably overcoming shyness a sense of achievement and self-expression or more generally as an opportunity for social interchange and communication
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. given that earlier evidence indicated that young peoples leisuretime arts-participation item was higher in rural than urban areas and vice versa for media-arts: audience it is suggested that much of the greater proportion of urban respondents declaring that their involvement had gone up is due to increased interest in and consumption of media-arts: audience activities eg going to the cinema listening to music
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. since item produced evidence that indicated that young peoples recollections of their leisure-time pursuits while at secondary school displayed no significant age-related variation in their participation n the arts the increased involvement for the over- is is very significant and confirms findings of an upturn of interest in the arts n the older age group
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. beyond that young people in urban locations consistently ranked a slightly higher percentage of responses in the areas of social development as an outcome of arts involvement with for instance per cent mentioning making friends/meeting more people compared with per cent of the rural sample and ability to work with others referred to by per cent of the urban sample compared with per cent of those in rural locations
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. put together a strong emphasis on experiencing literary arts in school both as participants and consumer is very evident while music shows a particular significance in leisure-time
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. equally only per cent of young people from the professional class suggested their arts involvement had decreased after their school career compared to per cent of social class iv and v
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. interesting findings also emerged in connection with interviewees perceptions of missed and future opportunities in the arts
View Harland, J., ; Kinder , K., ; Hartley, K., Arts in their view. A study of youth participation in the arts. while the study produced evidence that negative attitudes can constitute substantial impediments to young peoples participation in the arts it also provided many persuasive accounts of the benefits and effects which can be derived from sustained engagement in the arts amply demonstrated by those young people displaying positive attitudes or arts motivations
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. social capital
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. community art as a generator of social capital
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. improving understanding of different cultures & lifestyles
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. improving consultation between government & community
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. developing communities
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. community is a lived experience
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. developing community identity
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. reducing social isolation
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. social and political awareness
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. personal social and political awareness
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. although the study shows that community-based arts projects generate significant develop- mental outcomes it has drawn little response from community arts practitioners commu- nity workers or policy makers in australia
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. it argues for recognition of the critical link between community culture and social cohesion and demonstrates how community-based arts programs are powerful catalysts for developing healthy viable communities
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. this view of culture emphasises the importance of expressing community values creating a sense of place gaining new insights and learning new ways of doing things
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. it values community artistic expression as an important way in which communities can create a sense of place affirm their values assert their differences and communicate their aspirations
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. it provides room for people to participate in artistic communication as well as spectate
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. it is an essential and powerful way in which people build and rebuild community release creative energy and transform minds organi- sations institutions and society
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. overall respondents recorded positive impact for each outcome area as follows: % recognised positive educational outcomes % recognised positive artistic outcomes % recognised positive social outcomes % recognised positive economic outcomes the findings demonstrated that the value of these arts projects and programs was largely in terms of social or cultural impact and influenced several types of outcome: building and developing communities increasing social capital activating social change developing human capital improving economic performance the following chapters take each of these areas and examines why those outcomes are im- portant and how community-based collaborative arts projects can produce these results
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. social capital community-based collaborative arts projects are highly effective in producing the following social capital outcomes: improved communication of ideas and information improved skills in planning and organising activities improved understanding of different cultures or lifestyles improved consultation between government and community increased appreciation of community arts one of the most valuable activities we engage in as human beings is the business of creating and maintaining social order
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. we need the opportunities to interact with a reasonably broad spread of people and to build up a level of trust through positive rather than negative experiences
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. lack of trust and mutual understanding generates fear and social withdrawal erosion of community leadership skills and a lack of positive role models for community development
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. community art as a generator of social capital community-based collaborative artistic production as in the community arts model is an extraordinary catalyst for generating social capital
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. participants believed the creative process gave the young people and police an opportunity to relate to each other as people
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. improved skills in communicating ideas and information increased appreciation of community arts improved skills in planning and organising activities improved understanding of different cultures or lifestyles improved consultation between government and community these results indicate that community-based arts projects and programs are indeed effective ways to facilitate processes between people which establish networks norms social trust and facilitate co-ordination and co-operation for mutual benefitcoxs description of what generates social capital
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. developing communities community-based collaborative arts programs and projects are highly effective in producing the following community development outcomes: development of community identity decrease in social isolation improvements in recreational options development of local enterprise improvement in public facilities before examining how arts projects can produce these outcomes it is important to recon- sider the value of community as a fundamental unit of society
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. the need to perceive experience and feel a sense of belonging in a community is essential to individual well-being and to our systems of social organisation: witness the reality for many people in suburbs where there are poor community facilities high levels of social isolation lack of opportunity for personal and family advancement and where mistrust fear and aggression is role-modelled daily
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. diverse community life increases the opportunity for exposure to and participation in nu- merous communities thus increasing understandings of the world of human experience
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. secondly people understand culture through their experience of community which is most powerfully expressed through myth tradition and ritual
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. the experience also had a particularly positive impact on the children
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. as a re- sult the public approval successful risk taking and enjoyable team work experiences left feelings of increased self esteem and confidence
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. the public voice and recognition of their views was a powerful experience and one which created new social networks and a greater sense of belonging to many different communities
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. developed community identity: decreased social isolation: improved recreational options: developed local enterprise: improved public facilities: in periods of reducing government support for public services and an increasing reliance on market forces to produce solutions there is a greater need for communities to find new ways express their collective values and to address their employment education health and housing issues
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. community cultural expression is an essential component in the evolution and expression of a national culture
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. community culture plays a key role in fostering cul- tural diversity: it is a fundamental element in the expression of cultural values and social interaction is a requirement for this expression to occur
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. community arts projects can also be powerful catalysts for driving social change
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. raised public awareness of an issue: inspired action on a social issue: improved understanding of different cultures or lifestyles: generated employment: increased public safety: these results validate the impact of artistic expression in creating social and cultural change from a community base
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. the findings from creating social capital illustrate the strong link between community culture and social change
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. it proposes that as people develop their potential they encounter two types of life learning or learning for human development: first the learning necessary for self-re- newal and secondly the learning necessary for personal transformation
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. learning for human development helps people to evaluate critically and gain greater personal insights and understanding of the world around them
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. it also develops the confidence and skills to be an active participant in that world
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. the types of learning experiences that participants described closely relate to the renewal critical reflection and transformation experiences characterising learn- ing for human development
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. the impact of experiential learningseeing something differently the impact of defining or re-definingknowing what is meaningful the impact of finding a voicenaming what is important the impact of knowing how to take actionmaking the changes needed when combined these impacts represent the experiences of critical reflection renewal and transformation
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. improved communication skills ncreased ability in planning and organising improved ability to collect organise and analyse information ncreased problem solving skills developed creative talents the group interaction inherent in community-based arts projects provided the opportunity for people to gain wider social perspectives and helped them clarify their thoughts and/or decide what action they wanted to take
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. for individuals the learning experience might generate the impetus for significant life change or provide the skills and insights to advance their work or personal life goals
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. improved consultation between government and community improved planning for or design of public spaces improved developing public facilities the women ex-offenders theatre company case study also previously described recorded positive responses to indicators concerned with social issues relating to the incidence of criminal behaviour or the process of rehabilitation prevented crime led to employment developed local enterprise unpaid labour all the case study projects examined in creating social capital were effective in attracting re- sources for community cultural development outcomes
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. investments in the arts apart from developing artistic talents and inspiring further work of artistic merit commu- nity-based arts projects also generate support for and appreciation of the traditional or the fine arts
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. many community-based arts projects generate high levels of partic- ipation in artistic workshops and performance or as audiences volunteers and local spon- sors positively affecting participants and the wider community in favour of the arts
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. a creative arts focus: maintaining a creative arts focus to cultural development projects
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. successful risk taking: support for participants to set and achieve artistic and social challenges
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. meaningful levels of participation successful projects provided the opportunity for participants to take up artistic or social challenges that also contributed to achieving the goals set for the project
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. improvements to and increased use of public facilities increasing social capital improved levels of communication in community
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. improved levels of community planning and organisation
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. improved standards of consultation between government and community
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. increased business investment in community cultural development increased resources attracted into community and spent locally
View Williams, D., The social impact of arts programs. How the arts measure up: Australian research into social impact. creating social capital community arts network of south australia adelaide
View Degen, M., ; Garcia, M., The Transformation of the ‘Barcelona Model’: An Analysis of Culture, Urban Regeneration. the reconstruction of barcelona as provision of collective public services such as schools provision of new public spaces democratization of urban spaces provision of public housing phase architectural expression and urban pride marketing the city for the olympic games promoting urban lifestyles consensus provision of civic centres and libraries renovation of museums renovation of cultural infrastructure eg theatres top-down organized festivals support knowledge economy and cultural industries top-down organized participation promotion of interculturality
View Degen, M., ; Garcia, M., The Transformation of the ‘Barcelona Model’: An Analysis of Culture, Urban Regeneration. culture and the knowledge economy started to play a prominent role in the citys urban policies with the private sector playing a key role in funding cultural flagship projects after the olympics
View Degen, M., ; Garcia, M., The Transformation of the ‘Barcelona Model’: An Analysis of Culture, Urban Regeneration. public financing also helped to build a web of consortia and networks to sustain and ensure continuity in cultural activities
View Degen, M., ; Garcia, M., The Transformation of the ‘Barcelona Model’: An Analysis of Culture, Urban Regeneration. as cities have become more socially fragmented the existence of organized neighbourhood associations and grassroots movements in general that influence urban policy has become more precarious even in cities with a successful history of citizenship participation such as barcelona
View García, B., Urban Regeneration, Arts Programming and Major Events: Glasgow 1990, Sydney 2000 and Barcelona 2004 this mixture of contexts provides an opportunity to compare them and identify strengths and challenges in their contributions towards urban regeneration
View García, B., Urban Regeneration, Arts Programming and Major Events: Glasgow 1990, Sydney 2000 and Barcelona 2004 arts programming also provides a good platform for developing new or strengthening existing collaborations
View García, B., Urban Regeneration, Arts Programming and Major Events: Glasgow 1990, Sydney 2000 and Barcelona 2004 arts programming can greatly contribute to urban regeneration in the context of a major event hosting process
View Landry, C., ; Bianchini, F., The Creative City planners find it easier to think in terms of expen- diture on highways car parks and physical redevelopment schemes rather than on soft infrastructures such as training initiatives for skills enhancement the encouragement of a lively night-time economy grants to voluntary organisations to develop social networks or social innovations and the decentralisation of powers to build up local capac- ity and encourage people to have a stake in the running of their neigh- bourhoods
View Landry, C., ; Bianchini, F., The Creative City public spaces can also act as catalysts by attracting different types of people and encouraging interaction
View Landry, C., ; Bianchini, F., The Creative City participation creates ownership; people are more likely to become stakeholders in projects they have participated in
View Landry, C., ; Bianchini, F., The Creative City many creative people working in administrations businesses and voluntary organisations have tried and failed to change their cities
View Landry, C., ; Bianchini, F., The Creative City the presence of artists and other cultural producers in declining urban areas helps restore vitality develop a positive image create addi- tional employment and break cycles of decline
View Landry, C., ; Bianchini, F., The Creative City a creative partnership allows the different partners to play to their respective strengths
View Richards, A. G.; Tietyen, A.C.; Jicha, G.A.; Bardach, S.H.; Schmitt, F.A.; Fardo, D.W.; Kryscio, R.J.; Abner, E.L. Visual Arts Education improves self-esteem for persons with dementia and reduces caregiver burden: A randomized controlled trial. one of the avenues recently investigated for improving qol for older adults as well as persons with adrd is to encourage their participation in creative arts activities
View Richards, A. G.; Tietyen, A.C.; Jicha, G.A.; Bardach, S.H.; Schmitt, F.A.; Fardo, D.W.; Kryscio, R.J.; Abner, E.L. Visual Arts Education improves self-esteem for persons with dementia and reduces caregiver burden: A randomized controlled trial. a recent review of participatory art programs for older cognitively normal adults suggests over- whelmingly positive cognitive affective and quality-of-life outcomes for various participa- tory art forms including dance expressive writing music singing and instrumental theatre arts and visual arts noice noice & kramer
View Richards, A. G.; Tietyen, A.C.; Jicha, G.A.; Bardach, S.H.; Schmitt, F.A.; Fardo, D.W.; Kryscio, R.J.; Abner, E.L. Visual Arts Education improves self-esteem for persons with dementia and reduces caregiver burden: A randomized controlled trial. vae activities when applied in an enriching learning format are known to stimulate and integrate multiple domains of learning that include cognitive affective physical sensorimotor skills person- al interpersonal and social domains eisner ; jensen ; richards ; steiner
View Richards, A. G.; Tietyen, A.C.; Jicha, G.A.; Bardach, S.H.; Schmitt, F.A.; Fardo, D.W.; Kryscio, R.J.; Abner, E.L. Visual Arts Education improves self-esteem for persons with dementia and reduces caregiver burden: A randomized controlled trial. in addition to stimulation and engagement with a wide scope of domains certain types of cognitive processes are enhanced and stimulated while creating works of art: attention focus and concentration divergent thinking visual-spatial awareness image for- mation memory imagination inspiration and intuition arnheim ; eisner ; gardner ; richards ; steiner
View Richards, A. G.; Tietyen, A.C.; Jicha, G.A.; Bardach, S.H.; Schmitt, F.A.; Fardo, D.W.; Kryscio, R.J.; Abner, E.L. Visual Arts Education improves self-esteem for persons with dementia and reduces caregiver burden: A randomized controlled trial. it is also possible that persons with adrd in the experimental group gained a sense of empowerment through their accomplishments in the visual arts study that extended into their daily lives
View Whiteman, E.D.; Dupuis, R.; Morgan, A.U.; D’Alonzo, B.; Epstein, C.; Klusaritz, H.; Cannuscio, C.C. Public Libraries As Partners for Health Public libraries also serve as places of refuge for vulnerable populations, including people experiencing mental illness, homelessness, immigration challenges, and trauma
View Whiteman, E.D.; Dupuis, R.; Morgan, A.U.; D’Alonzo, B.; Epstein, C.; Klusaritz, H.; Cannuscio, C.C. Public Libraries As Partners for Health in addition to responding to requests from patrons libraries also serve as sites of educational health programming
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature as well as art therapists an increasing number of stakeholders are involved in projects such as arts agencies artists community arts workers and designers
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature this research has influenced policy and official advice identifies key aesthetic and functional considerations such as engendering a non- institutional atmosphere distracting patients from stress and anxiety helping people to navigate their way around and fostering a sense of ownership and pride in public buildings
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature for example the study by ulrich et al examined physiological measures including blood pressure and pulse rate as well as psychosocial self-report measures to compare the effects of nature conditions with other conditions on patients undergoing a stressful procedure blood donation in a us hospital
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature a non-significant reduction in falls was associated with vinyl flooring compared to carpets in a study of elderly patients in a community hospital
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature us hospital survey found that patients expressed a greater need for privacy than staff believed they had with the majority of medical and mental health patients preferring a private room
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature mental health patients appeared to have more definitive and polarised reactions to their environment than other groups
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature another study focused on behavioural responses to the environment investigating the impact of architectural design on way-finding in patients with dementia in a large hospital
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature these reported safety issues including a nonsignificant reduction in falls associated with vinyl flooring compared to carpets in a study of elderly patients in a community hospital and found significant improvements in staff perceptions of working conditions following changes in acoustic conditions in a study of nurses in a coronary care unit
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature the authors conclude that improved conditions and speech intelligibility enhanced staff wellbeing reducing risks of conflicts and errors
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature finally schofield examined cancer patients responses to a specialist environment snoezelen that was associated with enhanced sense of calm
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature this study assessed the impact of grants awarded to uk national health service hospital trusts for environmental improvements to patient areas
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature patients in the newer buildings expressed significantly more satisfaction with the appearance layout and overall design of their wards
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature patients expressed a greater need for privacy than staff believed they had with the majority of medical and mental health patients preferring a private room
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature the study identified some differences between different types of patients with mental health patients appearing to have more definitive reactions to their environment than other groups
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature key findings from the review include evidence that exposure to the arts may reduce anxiety and depression in specific groups of patients
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature positive effects of environmental conditions have also been identified including reduced stress reduced risk improved way-finding and enhanced perceptions of healthcare environments
View Daykin, N.; Byrne, E.; Soteriou, T.; O’Connor, S. The impact of art, design and enviroment in mental healthcare: a systematic review of the literature attitude surveys indicate high levels of approval for arts particularly among patients
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults To assess psychological wellbeing in a novel social prescription intervention for older adults called Museums on Prescription and to explore the extent of change over time in six self-rated emotions
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults Conclusion: Museums can be instrumental in offering museum-based programmes for older adults to improve psychological wellbeing over time
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults Participants in the study experienced a sense of privilege, valued the opportunity to liaise with curators, visit parts of the museum closed to the public and handle objects normally behind glass
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults Participants appreciated opportunities afforded by creative and co-productive activities to acquire learning and skills, and get to know new people in a different context
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults public health england phe stated that communities both place-based and where people share a common identity or affinity have a vital contribution to make in health and wellbeing and that the assets within communities such as the skills and knowledge social networks and community organisations are building blocks for good health p
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults social prescribing aligns with local and national agendas to improve health and wellbeing and reduce health inequalities because it is patient-centred; not just what the nhs can do; it is a conduit for involving patients in their community and opening the channels between service sectors p
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults nhs england has identified social prescribing as a key means by which patients can benefit from wider provision; voluntary sector organisations in particular play a vital role in assisting the work of general practice in providing access to community-based practical support and help for specific groups such as carers
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults in the united kingdom wellbeing has been actively integrated into museum programming to target vulnerable audiences including mental health service users people with dementia stroke survivors and people with physical disability
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults research has shown that museum spaces and the collections they house provide opportunities for positive social interactions calming experiences learning and acquisition of new skills leading to increased self-esteem sense of identity inspiration and opportunities for meaning making in addition to reduced social isolation and decreased anxiety
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults in a study of hospital patients and care home residents a mixed-methods framework was used to assess the impact of min museum object handling sessions on participants using pre-post session measures of psychological and subjective wellbeing alongside qualitative analysis of session recordings
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults quantitative measures showed significant increases in participant wellness and happiness scores
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults qualitative analysis revealed that patients used the heritage objects combined with tailored and easy social interaction sensory stimulus and learning opportunities to tap into concerns about identity emotions energy levels and motivation pp
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults furthermore the role and value of museums in contributing to wellbeing or wellness agendas was seen to merit broader exploration to reflect on the fit with a wider healthcare landscape of social prescribing and other key health priorities p
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults a qualitative study of older adult group discussion of contemporary art found that participants existing cultural and social capital was affected by their initial engagement subsequent relationships and development throughout the three gallery visits of the intervention
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults qualitative evaluation of an art gallery intervention with people with dementia found that the setting was seen as valued special and somewhere different it provided intellectual stimulation in terms of engagement with art as a universal interest; offered opportunities for social inclusion carer respite and support; and positively affected public perceptions of people with dementia
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults the intervention helped foster social inclusion and social engagement enhance the relationship between carers and people with dementia and stimulate cognitive processes of attention and concentration
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults social inclusion is an important outcome in museum interventions as decrease in social isolation is a key contributor to wellbeing in older adults and social engagement remains a critical effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults determinant of physical health into late adulthood
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults evidence shows that participatory arts in older age groups can challenge ideas of decline re-connect people to communities and target health needs that threaten wellbeing
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults a -year trial of a participatory arts activity that assigned older adults and over to either the intervention group choral singing or comparison group usual activity found higher positive effects for the intervention group in self-ratings of physical health eg fewer doctor visits less medication use fewer falls activity level morale and loneliness in contrast with the comparison group that demonstrated a significant decline
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults traditional models of successful ageing propose the interdependence of multi- dimensional components such as the low probability of disease and disability maintenance of high cognitive and physical function and sustained engagement with social and productive activities
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults a recent study of adaptive ageing in oldest-old adults octogenarians and centenarians noted that this model failed to take into account the influence of subjective wellbeing
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults the study suggested that positive affect was directly determined by social resources such as the intensity of social interactions and indirectly affected by cognitive functioning and education
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults the reported study was a museum- based intervention that aimed to offer -week programmes of engaging creative and socially interactive sessions of around h each comprising curator talks behind-the-scenes tours object handling and discussion and arts activities inspired by the exhibits
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults the mwm-oa assesses psychological wellbeing as an indicator of the mental state of the individual and although there are other aspects of wellbeing such as physical and social wellbeing the measure focuses on levels of self-reported changes in six emotions found to be aspects of wellbeing more likely to change as a result of a relatively short intervention such as participating in a museum or gallery activity
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults findings showed that two emotions enlightened and absorbed were responsible for the effect of the interaction and increased more pre-post-session than the other four emotions
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults for physiological measures comparison of repeated tests across time has led to an awareness of the level of change constituting a clinically meaningful difference but with health-related quality- of-life measures such as wellbeing the meaning of change is less intuitively apparent not only because it has no familiar units but also because health professionals seldom use quality of life measures in clinical practice p
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults described social capital outcomes as bonding between participants bridging between participants and group leaders and linking between participants art educators or researchers
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults when interviewed many participants highlighted the opportunity to handle museum objects and engage with collections and curators; they commented on learning new information and being absorbed by it and acquiring new skills which could account for increases in the absorbed and enlightened items of the measure
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults it has been argued that when individuals interact with museums and their collections it is the intrinsic physical and material properties of the objects they encounter that trigger memories projections sensory emotional and cognitive associations
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults museum objects may function as symbols for aspects of peoples lives such as identity relationships nature society and religion; these symbolic and meaning-making properties could account for their therapeutic potential; and the physical cognitive and emotional interactions elicited by these multiencountered for one or two sessions
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults previous authors have shown that high levels of social resources have a direct effect on positive affect and physical health whereas cognitive functioning and education have an indirect effect on positive affect
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults the social resources engendered by the museum-based programme directly increased the positive affect demonstrated by significant improvements in the wellbeing emotions and it is likely that physical health for some participants will also improve; one participant reported that since taking part in the museum programme they felt more positive about my life and health and more determined to keep up my practice of photography and painting that required a level of physical fitness as the participant had formed a meet-up group to go sketching in and around a contemporary art gallery
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults in terms of developmental adaptation participants seemed keen to share their ideas memories and past experiences pre-post session changes in emotions over programme which they tended to express in a positive light with reference to learning curves and knowing better next time
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults the happy museum project for example sought to demonstrate the qualities that cultural institutions can foster in terms of institutional and communal wellbeing and resilience in the face of global challenges
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults it is interesting therefore to consider the potential economic impact of culturally oriented social prescribing programmes such as museums on prescription specifically in terms of health and wellbeing but also for community regeneration and forging a more equable society
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults museums can be instrumental in offering older adult activities that improve psychological wellbeing and may lead to long-term outcomes such as sustained social capital and enhanced physical health
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults although geographically extensive and carried out over years each museum-based programme was relatively short term at weeks and a rolling programme of older adult activities needs to be implemented to examine sustained effects on health and wellbeing over several years
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults participants in the museums on prescription study rated highly the experiences of feeling absorbed and enlightened by the sessions and commented on the opportunities afforded by the museum-based activities to acquire new learning and develop new skills
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults the high levels of significance and effect sizes in the study infer that findings can be generalised more widely to other populations of vulnerable and lonely older adults at risk of social isolation and imply that provision of socially prescribed museum-based sessions could be scaled up nationally to address social and cultural inequities
View Thomson, L. J.; Lockyer, B.; Camic, P. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults the reported study contributes to a wider body of evidence on how cultural engagement can bring about positive outcomes for older adults at risk of social exclusion by improving positive emotion; it is likely that this occurs through creative processes involving new learning and acquisition of skills and the formation of social capital through co-productivity exchange of ideas and enhanced sense of community and belonging
View Dowdall, N.; Melendez-Torres, G.J.; Murray, L.; Gardner, F.; Hartford, L.; Cooper, P.J. Shared Picture Book Reading Interventions for Child Language Development: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis a second trial carried out in rural bangladesh evaluated a preschool classroom-based intervention for - year olds with index children also showing signicantly improved expressive vocabulary com- pared to controls opel ameer & aboud
View Dowdall, N.; Melendez-Torres, G.J.; Murray, L.; Gardner, F.; Hartford, L.; Cooper, P.J. Shared Picture Book Reading Interventions for Child Language Development: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis in a subsequent larger rct compared to a control group that received no intervention the - to -month- old children whose carers received the dialogic book- sharing training showed signicant and substantial improvement in expressive and receptive language as well as in focal attention vally et al
View Dowdall, N.; Melendez-Torres, G.J.; Murray, L.; Gardner, F.; Hartford, L.; Cooper, P.J. Shared Picture Book Reading Interventions for Child Language Development: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis found that improvements in caregiver sensitivity during book- sharing signicantly mediated the impact of the intervention on receptive language while improve- ments in caregiver-child reciprocity during book- sharing mediated the impact of the intervention on both child expressive language and receptive lan- guage and child focal attention
View Xie, Q.W.; Chan, C.H.Y.; Ji, Q.; Chan, C.L.W. Psychosocial Effects of Parent-Child Book Reading Interventions: A Meta-analysis psychosocial functioning encompasses various aspects of psychiatric psychological and social competence and well-being and it refers to the ability of self-caring or working a positive evaluation of self and life and a positive well- being received from meaningful relationships or activities
View Tavano Blessi, G.; Grossi, E.; Sacco, P. L.; Piereti, G.; Ferilli, G. The contribution of cultural participation to urban well-being. A comparative study in Bolzano/Bozen and Siracusa, Italy in both cities there is an evident direct correlation between a co-morbidity condition and a health-related perception of quality of life
View Tavano Blessi, G.; Grossi, E.; Sacco, P. L.; Piereti, G.; Ferilli, G. The contribution of cultural participation to urban well-being. A comparative study in Bolzano/Bozen and Siracusa, Italy as reported by borghesi and vercelli the unem- ployed are victims of anxiety anger and depression and suffer from a loss of self-esteem and social status that may disrupt family and social life p
View Tavano Blessi, G.; Grossi, E.; Sacco, P. L.; Piereti, G.; Ferilli, G. The contribution of cultural participation to urban well-being. A comparative study in Bolzano/Bozen and Siracusa, Italy therefore when policy action is taken to create such opportunities their social benets become more evident and this in turn paves the way to more policy action and so on thus creating a virtuous circle of culture-driven wellbeing
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users The intervention involved weekly outreach sessions using heritage activities such as object handling and museum visits as inspiration for creative responses through a variety of media
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users The research used an asset-based approach focused on participant strength and potential, nurtured and enhanced through museum activities
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users the study examined the effects of museum outreach sessions on confidence sociability and well-being measures for mental health n and addiction recovery n service-users taking an asset-based approach and research design
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users conclusions: creative museum activities showed increases in participant levels of confidence sociability and well- being
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users provide a positive social experience reducing social isolation;
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users elicit an emotional response that encourages positive feelings such as optimism hope and enjoyment;
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users findings draw upon a longer tradition of arts in health research which includes evidence showing how active participation in activities such as music-making creative writing and visual arts can have a measurable impact on physical and mental well-being for reviews see royal society for public health ; staricoff ; stuckey & nobel
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users practice-based studies of heritage-in-health interventions have shown how object handling sessions with hospital patients led to improvements in quality of life measures chatterjee vreeland & noble and psychological well-being and happiness thomson et al
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users gallery studies have demonstrated the therapeutic role of viewing art in supporting family carers of people with chronic mental ill health roberts et al
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users the intervention involved weekly outreach sessions using heritage activities such as object handling and museum visits as inspiration for creative responses through a variety of media
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users the ways in which individuals relate to social networks and communities have important effects on peoples health and well-being and social isolation and loneliness can have a negative impact on physical and mh holt-lunstad smith & layton
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users recovery-oriented practice in mh and addiction services share many common elements such as a person-centred and long- term approach and like the asset-based model they focus on strengthening individual factors eg confidence well-being and motivation and community support networks granfield & cloud
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users in the context of arts and health holt and kaiser showed how viewing and discussing art can motivate patients with addiction issues to change
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users in a qualitative study reynolds showed how engaging in creative needlecraft built a sense of achievement self-esteem and confidence which helped participants with depression to manage low moods although conclusions need to be interpreted with caution as diagnosis was ascertained via self- report
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users ar participants identified their confidence as deriving from having tried something new and that museum outreach sessions provided an environment where participants could try a new activity without fear of embarrassment
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users participants identified new things about specific museum objects and local history
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users interestingly activities brought back childhood memories for three participants bringing creativity and a sense of play back into their adult lives: remembering creating mats when i was young and using them as blankets
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users the findings suggested that museum activities that are developed within an asset-based model like the current study can contribute to increasing individual social capital for mh and ar service-users
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users although it has been suggested that within therapeutic intervention it is the social interaction that is key simmons museum object handling research showed that the presence of objects and the act of touching were central in enhancing intervention benefits paddon et al
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users overall this preliminary study contributes to understanding how museum activities can make a positive contribution to recovery for mh and ar service-users by evidencing the effects of museum sessions on confidence sociability and well-being
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users the mixed-method data showed that participant levels of confidence sociability and well- being improved over the course of the museum sessions though it is not clear to what extent the nature of the museum-focused activities or participation in a collaborative creative process produced gains above that of being part of a group
View Morse, N.; Thomson, L.J.M.; Brown, Z.; Chatterjee, H.J. Effects of creative museum outreach sessions on measures of confidence, sociability and well-being for mental health and addiction recovery service-users as a non-clinical intervention the programme showed that museum outreach sessions developed within an asset-based model have the potential to contribute to positive outcomes linked to the recovery service-users in mh and addiction services
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia suggested that a gallery open to the public at the same time enabled an intellectually stimulating learning experience social interaction increases in confidence and support for carers which led to enjoyment changes in the perceptions of dementia from carers and facilitators and continued connections with the gallery
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia This alternative to the task-focussed aspect of caring appeared to be an important contextual factor triggering quality time together and carer-patient social interactions subsequently improving social connectedness and enjoyment
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia suggested that the carers involvement in the group was important for the participants as it facilitated communication and meaningful relationships enabling them to see the creative side of the person with dementia and reduce their levels of stress
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia Student volunteers interacting with care home residents developed a deeper understanding of dementia and improved confidence which led to positive attitude changes about older adults
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia Facilitators and artists developed a deep insight into dementia and increases in confidence leading to different perspective of the condition despite initial apprehensions and gained new insights into the abilities and challenges of people living with dementia
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia Cognitive stimulation Cognitive stimulation is a form of mental exercise and a psychosocial treatment for people with dementia where a number of enjoyable activities provide general stimulation for thinking concentration and memory usually in a social setting such as a small group
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia First people living with a significant challenge to their lives -dementia - reported positive outcomes
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia Given the growing interest in the arts for dementia care recognising that many people will be developing their skills and practice our findings can be summarised into a conceptual framework for intervention and further research
View Windle, G.; Gregory, S.; Howson-Griffiths, T.; Newman, A.; O Brien, D.; Gouldin, A. Exploring the theoretical foundations of visual art programmes for people living with dementia Other theoretical approaches to understanding how visual arts programmes impact on wellbeing could be suggested in the future particularly as the arts and health literature develops
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature Aims: This rapid review explores the role of arts activities in promoting the mental wellbeing and resilience of children and young people aged between 11 and 18 years
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature it was found that participating in arts activities can have a positive effect on self-confidence, self-esteem, relationship building and a sense of belonging, qualities which have been associated with resilience and mental wellbeing
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature Conclusions: Although the research evidence is limited, there is some support for providing structured group arts activities to help build resilience and contribute to positive mental wellbeing of children and young people
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature INTRODUCTION A review exploring the effects of participating in creative activities on the health and wellbeing of children and young people found that increased self-esteem sense of achievement empowerment social skills and promotion of social engagement are some of the commonly reported benefits of taking part in such activities
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature These characteristics have been linked to resilience and resilience is recognised as a component of mental wellbeing enabling people to cope with adversity to achieve their full potential and to contribute to society
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature Research into the extent of mental ill-health among children and young people in the United Kingdom revealed that in children and young people between the ages of and have a diagnosable mental health condition
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature For children and young people this was translated into Child Adolescent Mental Health Services designed to be accessible for all to promote and enhance children and young peoples wellbeing and mental health
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature Already government policy supports the introduction of social prescribing schemes and arts activities are provided under social prescribing schemes around the country with evidence emerging that such schemes can produce positive outcomes for health and wellbeing
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature Participating in creative arts has been linked to positive outcomes for children and young people such as the development of social skills and positive changes in behaviour
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature However while the previous review explored the potential of creative activities to enhance the health and wellbeing of children and young people looking at broad aspects of both physical and mental health the focus of this review is the role that participating in community-based arts plays in enhancing the mental wellbeing of children and young people
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature To examine whether community arts interventions could provide cost-effective services that promote protective factors linked to resilience and mental wellbeing such as developing a sense of belonging and purpose social inclusion relationship building and improve social skills and self-esteem
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature Although none of the other studies linked the findings of their research directly to building resilience participating in arts programmes was linked to positive youth development social and emotional development reduction in emotional problems and the promotion of social development and wellbeing
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature INTRINSIC FACTORS Sense of belonging and identity formation Arts may play a role in identity development as the activities give people an opportunity to explore and learn about themselves
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature The participants in the Youth Arts Programme linked identity with a sense of belonging through the exposure to different people and experiences and the opportunity to meet like-minded people
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature Age range - years United Kingdom Performing arts competition Rock Eisteddfod Challenge Key findings Limitations/comment GASP score Participants reported a link between arts participation and increased confidence identity formation and sense of belonging Retrospective study -number of years since participation in art activity not specified High levels of engagement with the programme Evidence of increased confidence and strengthened skills in chosen art form
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature Reported increase in artistic skills Increased awareness of stereotypes and underlying attitudes Higher level of social awareness There is little detail regarding the interviews
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature found that engagement in arts activities most significantly predicted a sense of meaning/purpose in life
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature For participants in the UK-based Rock Challenge performing and being involved in organising the performance had developed team working and created new friendships
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature However what is clear is that there remains a significant gap in the research evidence directly linking arts participation and the promotion of mental wellbeing and resilience
View Zarobe, L.; Bungay, H. The role of arts activities in developing resilience and mental wellbeing in children and young people a rapid review of the literature While the existing evidence does provide an indication of the potential value of participating in arts activities to enhance wellbeing and resilience further research which meets the requirements of healthcare commissioners will be necessary if the use of arts interventions is to become adjunct to traditional health service provision
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture people s awareness and perceptions - from to overall positive impressions of liverpool increased amongst the uk population from % to % while negative views dropped from % to %
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture - % of visitors particularly liked the general atmosphere and % the feeling of welcome - % of uk businesses believed the ecoc had a positive impact on liverpool s image
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture the research framework has focused on the economic social and cultural dimensions of impact grouped in five main thematic clusters: - cultural access and participation - economy and tourism - cultural vibrancy and sustainability - image and perceptions - governance and delivery process consideration has also been given to the impacts on social capital and the physical environment
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture research showed that being an volunteer gave people the opportunity to reach out to others and make connections and friendships
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture volunteers had also experienced a range of more tangible outcomes as a result of their participation
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture a limited number of participants in the research suggested that they had seen increases in their client base which they felt could be partly attributed to the liverpool ecoc
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture overall views on liverpool remained far more positive than on other cities and rose between and with % of respondents feeling positive about the general atmosphere compared to % in and % in other cities and % feeling positive about the feeling of welcome compared with % in and % in other cities
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture views on attractions range quality of service and value for money ranged between % and % positive in compared with all cities averages of %- % positive in and showed a rise from liverpool scores of %-% positive in
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture in early it is possible to offer a robust overview of the impact of gaining the title as there has been an opportunity to test changes in city perceptions and their impact on areas such as resident and business confidence over six years
View García, B., ; Melville, R., ; Cox, T., Creating an Impact: Liverpool’s Experience as European Capital of Culture cultural access and participation volunteering for culture: exploring the impact of being an volunteer neighbourhood impacts: a longitudinal research study into the impact of the liverpool ecoc on local residents impacts of culture on quality of life: a pilot toolkit
View Brown, M.I.; Westerveld, M.F.; Trembath, D.; Gillon, G.T. Promoting language and social communication development in babies through an early storybook reading intervention understanding how parents read with their baby the type of books they use the importance and enjoyment they place on reading as well as the frequency of reading activities parents engage in with their baby may shed light on factors that help facilitate esr for parents as well as barriers they may encounter
View Brown, M.I.; Westerveld, M.F.; Trembath, D.; Gillon, G.T. Promoting language and social communication development in babies through an early storybook reading intervention the findings indicated that % of parents start reading to their baby from birth with % of parents attending the library and/or bookstore frequently and % having over childrens books within their family home
View Brown, M.I.; Westerveld, M.F.; Trembath, D.; Gillon, G.T. Promoting language and social communication development in babies through an early storybook reading intervention specifically future research should examine whether language and social com- munication skills can be enhanced from esr with babies and the intensity of instruction/intervention needed for significant improvements in language and social communication to be observed
View Brown, M.I.; Westerveld, M.F.; Trembath, D.; Gillon, G.T. Promoting language and social communication development in babies through an early storybook reading intervention in line with the language development findings the broader social communication results also suggest that esr intervention workshops may support broader social communication development and that when parents are provided with more demon- strations support and feedback higher broader social communication scores can be achieved
View Brown, M.I.; Westerveld, M.F.; Trembath, D.; Gillon, G.T. Promoting language and social communication development in babies through an early storybook reading intervention h demon- strations ongoing support practice opportunity and personalised feedback significantly higher language and broader social communication scores are observed compared to a li intervention min with fewer demonstrations no ongoing support no personalised feedback nor practice opportunity
View Brown, M.I.; Westerveld, M.F.; Trembath, D.; Gillon, G.T. Promoting language and social communication development in babies through an early storybook reading intervention this study indicates that when parents are provided with esr intervention work- shops on how to choose age appropriate books for babies and information on how to create a positive home reading environment that encourages parent- child interactions for babies with preverbal and emerging language skills that higher language and broader social communication scores are observed
View Brown, M.I.; Westerveld, M.F.; Trembath, D.; Gillon, G.T. Promoting language and social communication development in babies through an early storybook reading intervention the findings from this study suggest that hi esr intervention workshops are associated with higher language and broader social communication scores compared to a li esr intervention workshop
View Brown, M.I.; Westerveld, M.F.; Trembath, D.; Gillon, G.T. Promoting language and social communication development in babies through an early storybook reading intervention all of the participants from both the hi group and li group reported that they enjoyed attending the esr intervention workshops and participants from both groups demonstrated a significant improvement in their language and broader social communication scores as well as home reading practices
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review Studies on the quality of life in asthma patients have indicated that symptoms depend not only on the severity and duration of the disease, but also on the social and psychological condition of the patient and their family
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review Furthermore, depression can affect the patients compliance to treatment
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review Literature also shows a development of multidisciplinary programs for asthma treatment that are complemented by relaxation methods such as progressive muscle, mental, muscular and functional relaxation, guided imagery, hypnotherapy, autogenic training, biofeedback techniques and music therapy
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review According to the American Music Therapy Association, music therapy is the use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review studies on the quality of life in asthma patients have indicated that symptoms depend not only on the severity and duration of the disease but also on the social and psychological condition of the patient and their family
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review fur- thermore depression can affect the patients compliance to treatment
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review literature also shows a development of multidisciplinary programs for asthma treatment that are complemented by relaxation methods such as progressive muscle mental muscular and functional relaxation guided imagery hyp- notherapy autogenic training biofeedback techniques and music therapy
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review the interventions varied from passive music therapy listening to relaxation music pro- gressive muscle relaxation with background music to active music therapy breathing exercises singing and/or playing wind instruments
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review the authors of a second rct of high risk of bias aimed to test the efcacy of a multidisciplinary program pulmonary rehabilitation and passive music therapy on anxiety and dyspnea intensity in patients hospitalized with asthma
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review using grade approach the quality of evidence for effects of music listening on both asthma symptoms and lung function in asthma was moderate
View Sliwka, A.; Wloch, T.; Tynor, D.; Nowobilski, R. Do asthmatics benefit from music therapy? A systematic review the highest quality trials used music listening as therapeutic intervention that was addressed to adult patients with asthma
View Kasahara-Kiritani, M.; Hadlaczky, G.; Westerlund, M.; Carli, V.; Wasserman, C.; Apter, A.; Balazs, J.; Bobes, J.; Brunner, R.; McMahon, E.M.; Cosman, D.; Farkas, L.; Haring, C.; Kaess, M.; Kahn, J.P.; Keeley, H.; Nemes, B.; Bitenc, U.M.; Postuvan, V.; Saiz, P.; Sisask, M.; Värnik, A.; Sarchiapone, M.; Hoven, C.W.; Wasserman, D. Reading books and watching films as a protective factor against suicidal ideation evidence shows that the amount of reading impacts on social skills as well as community participation []
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities The project focused on the growing body of research work examining the impact of participating in arts and cultural activity on other areas of social interest such as: cognitive skills and educational attainment; community pride/identity; crime prevention; mood; self-esteem; social behaviour; social cohesion; and health
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities the first stage of the project aimed to map and assess the current international and australian research based around the impact of participation in arts and cultural activity on eight focus areas
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities social impact is defined as desired changes in attitudes or behaviour in target groups or individuals
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities in australia there is great interest among policymakers in considering social as well as economic impacts when developing policies and programs for arts and cultural activities and in encouraging collaboration between arts fields and other social and economic initiatives in the pursuit of social objectives
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities the study thus found widespread interest in and commitment to the inclusion of social impact objectives in the development of policies and programs for the arts and cultural activities among policymakers and arts area officials
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities research into the long-term impact of arts participation began with the publication in and of studies by williams in australia and matarasso in the uk
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities a distinction was made between programs of arts or cultural activity such as a community-based program or an arts in education program and the on- going use of a cultural institution or facility such as a library museum gallery or archive
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities boxes - show the wide range of social impacts said to be associated with creative participation in the arts and cultural activities or with both creative and receptive participation in different types of programs
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities participation in an arts program impact : cultural and sporting activities increased employment rates reduced levels of crime better and more equal standards of health enhanced personal development social cohesion active citizenship public art and a sense of public ownership building cultural bridges better equipped cultural citizens better understanding of different cultures through diverse touring artists performances the development of cultural facilities as centres of civic pride improved education and life-long learning improved economic and employment opportunities improved social cohesion and community empowerment and community safety some environmental impacts development of self confidence and self-esteem increase in creativity and thinking skills improvement of skills in planning and organising activities improvement in the communication of ideas and information increased appreciation of arts creation of social capital strengthening of communities development of a community identity decrease in social isolation improved understanding of different cultures enhanced social cohesion activation of social change raised public awareness of an issue enhanced mental and physical health and well-being contributions to urban regeneration reduction in offending behaviour alleviation of the impact of poverty personal growth injects creativity into organisational planning make a vital contribution to the educational attainment of children and young people can contribute to neighbourhood renewal can make a real difference to health crime employment and education
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities participation in community- based projects related to health has: positive role models for those living in deprived neighbourhoods economic benefits to communities and individuals help develop personal confidence flexibility and self-reliance develop a sense of community help communities to express their identity and develop their own self-reliant organisations restores individual and community identity give individuals social organisational and marketable skills bring out hidden talents give individuals greater self-respect self-confidence and a sense of achievement can contribute to greater self-esteem and improved mental well- being change perceptions of an area help to build outside links for insular communities gaining skills increasing confidence divert youth from gangs drugs and the juvenile system reduce truancy improve academic performance build self-discipline communication and job skills crime prevention fewer new court referrals college attendance increased ability to express anger appropriately increased ability to communicate effectively with adults and their peers increased ability to cooperate with others increased ability to work on tasks from start to finish decreased frequency of delinquent behaviour improvements in attitude towards school self-esteem and self- efficacy healthy personal development healthy eating healthy mothering positive mental health emotional literacy health promotion healthy communities less reliance on medical support feeling better being creative and becoming absorbed in the arts helps in acknowledging and revealing feelings exposure to the arts imact is: stress reduction therapeutic benefit improved sociability skills development fewer readmissions to psychiatric hospital maintenance of mental health promotion of health networks increased referrals to health services sustains brain development promotes healing helps in treating alzheimers helps with reclaiming at-risk youth improved physical and mental health promotes recovery positive staff development and retention in the area of health decrease in blood pressure lowered anxiety lowered fear elevated mood
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities participation in arts activities impact perform better at school in a range of areas improving academic performance imparting skills for the st century workforce improving citizenship improving attendance fortifying cognitive skills increasing self-esteem reclaiming at-risk youth supporting life-long learning helping families cope higher academic grades higher standardised test scores higher measured reading levels improved attitudes concerning commitment to the community
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities box shows the range of impacts identified as being related to receptive participation in the arts and cultural activities
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities one study also found that the presence of a cultural institution had an effect on the sense of place in a local area usherwood
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities attendance at museums galleries and archives visiting a museum s impact: improved sense of community ownership education reading and literacy development of community confidence equity social inclusion increase in the individuals sense of self-worth value and motivation release of latent creative abilities and enhanced imagination vocabulary and self-expression leading to increased confidence and social inclusion contributes to community identity provides a forum for debate about emergent social issues fosters tolerance and understanding provides reverential and commemorative experiences creates a collective identity through a shared history and a sense of place increased self-esteem acquiring skills leading to further employment community empowerment capacity building
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities after consulting museum and gallery stakeholders in scotland another study suggested that local museums have an important role to play in realising educational agendas and promoting social justice and equity but this can be achieved only if their planning takes a strategic focus scottish executive
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities an evaluation guide developed by a number of organisations in victoria in order to fill the gap in the resources available to community arts practitioners to assist them in identifying collating and reporting on the positive outcomes achieved through community arts projects
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities in a general sense this focus encourages attempts to develop programs that develop social capacity and social cohesion and inclusion through cultural activities
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities the interviews also suggested that most policymakers and administrators are happy to review their role as specialists in the arts and cultural arena and to encourage arts organizations to play a role in broader fields of social change believing as one said that we have always been into that or that the arts may have an especially valuable and as yet not fully appreciated contribution to make
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities participation in events and other arts or cultural activities decreased from % to %
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities it found that the numbers of visits to museums and galleries increased market and opinion research international mori a
View Australian Expert Group in Industry Studies , AEGIS, Social impacts of Participation in the Arts and Cultural Activities awareness of the topic of the social impact of participation in the arts and cultural activity is particularly high in the uk
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. Results showed significant improvements in empowerment , mental health and social inclusion
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. Participants with higher CORE scores, no new stress in their lives and positive impressions of the impact of arts on their life benefited most over all three measures
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. This study suggests that arts participation positively benefits people with mental health difficulties
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. Arts participation increased levels of empowerment and had potential to impact on mental health and social inclusion
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. there is a conviction in practice and policy that parti- cipation in community art projects will help people with mental health problems gain wider social networks understand and deal with their mental health issues better and gain confidence and self-esteem
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. arts participation is a common community provision for people with various social and healthcare needs
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. this sort of community participation is seen as particularly important for recovery from mental health problems in the social sense of being able to lead a fulfilling life of ones choice regardless of the presence or absence of symptoms repper & perkins spandler et al
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. ten % people described their difficulty using the term bipolar or manic depression and four people % used schizophrenia
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. to investigate whether greater participation produced greater effect we divided people into higher and lower exposure groups
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. overall core scores significantly decreased over the months indicating improvement and subscale scores for problems/symptoms; risk and well-being also improved significantly although life functioning just missed significance
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. when participants filled in the second survey months after their completion of the first- entry survey core scores for the clinically significant group more severe problems had decreased by % improved while scores for less severe participants increased by % p =
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. table shows the results of our categorization of counts of positive attributions of improvement in outcomes to arts participation positive impact of arts
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. the majority of participants attributed perceived improvement to their arts participation
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. one of the most interesting findings identified through anova was the finding of significant positive empowerment and mental health impact for people with more severe mental health difficulties than for people with less severe difficulties
View Hacking, S.; Secker, J.; Spandler, H.; Kent, L.; Shenton, J. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs. the evidence for impact of arts participation on the social inclusion of participants as measured in this study is equivocal as it seems that although people attributed some benefit it seemed they perceived least impact from arts participation
View Thomson, L. J. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Well-Being With Objects: Evaluating a Museum ObjectHandling Intervention for Older Adults in Health Care Settings reviews of arts-in-health interventions staricoff indicate positive therapeutic and medical outcomes including reduced stress anxiety depression and blood pressure
View Thomson, L. J. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Well-Being With Objects: Evaluating a Museum ObjectHandling Intervention for Older Adults in Health Care Settings a gallery intervention for people with mild-to-moderate dementia eeckelaar camic & springham exploring art-viewing-art-making on prepost cognitive measures showed enhanced episodic memory but inconclusive findings for verbal flu- ency
View Thomson, L. J. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Well-Being With Objects: Evaluating a Museum ObjectHandling Intervention for Older Adults in Health Care Settings it was hypothesized that pre post comparisons would demonstrate enhanced well-being increase in positive emotion wellness and happiness; decrease in negative emotion across settings
View Thomson, L. J. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Well-Being With Objects: Evaluating a Museum ObjectHandling Intervention for Older Adults in Health Care Settings both female facilitators postdoctoral psychologist and postgraduate museum profes- sional received health and safety training infection control from london hospital and object handling from university museum and obtained disclosure and barring service dbs clearance
View Thomson, L. J. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Well-Being With Objects: Evaluating a Museum ObjectHandling Intervention for Older Adults in Health Care Settings psychiatric participants showed the largest reduction in negative panas moderate gains in vas wellness and greater gains in vas happiness
View Thomson, L. J. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Well-Being With Objects: Evaluating a Museum ObjectHandling Intervention for Older Adults in Health Care Settings reported museum sessions gave depressive or anxious participants an additional focus to wondering about their discharge date a finding that could account for increase in happiness but not lack of improvement in positive well-being so alternatively duration of stay was explored
View Thomson, L. J. M.; Chatterjee, H. J. Well-Being With Objects: Evaluating a Museum ObjectHandling Intervention for Older Adults in Health Care Settings studies but analysis of audio recordings implied similar cognitive gains of enhanced confidence social interaction and learning
View Cicerchia, A., Social and economic impacts of culture in ECoC Italian candidate cities an example is represented by the studies about the po- sitive variation of the general well-being of cancer patients following a continued experience of cultural participation and practice book rea- ding music dance theatre and so on: see hill
View Cicerchia, A., Social and economic impacts of culture in ECoC Italian candidate cities the commission contributes a small subsidy to european capitals of culture
View Cicerchia, A., Social and economic impacts of culture in ECoC Italian candidate cities in addition it focuses on particular sub-cultures and groups and explores experiences cultural values changing levels of participation and interests and reasons for participation
View Cicerchia, A., Social and economic impacts of culture in ECoC Italian candidate cities conceptual maps of impact indicators siena bidbook : access to culture and social inclusiveness economy and cultural image and perception cultural vibrancy inter-cultural dialogue competitiveness and local networks building and sustainability resource attraction cultural capacity access governance eu and global networks building and accountability building
View Cicerchia, A., Social and economic impacts of culture in ECoC Italian candidate cities for the social area sub-area identity and local pride: sense of belonging to the city and local pride of target groups immigrants young people citizens living in the periphery improved security and safety perception among residents for the social area sub-area demographics and social cohesion: n
View Cicerchia, A., Social and economic impacts of culture in ECoC Italian candidate cities economic impact: occupation in the cultural sector including women and young people enterprises in the cultural sector new enterprises in the cultural sector created in - and still active in turnover of the cultural sector entrepreneurship and new entrepreneurship in the areas involved in the programme tourist movement tourist accommodation capacity maritime and air routes active to and from cagliari and sardinia tourist flows in cagliari and sardinia ports and airports social impact: admissions to cultural places participants in the cultural events volunteers italian and foreign number of cultural associations participant associations young talents trained in artist residences new forms of cultural collaborations young talents operating in cagliari after participation of cagliari university students in international exchange and research programmes linked to the programme participation of children young and old people in the dedicated events
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings Search words included the following: arts engagement + health/hospital/recovery, arts + hospital/evidence/wellbeing, evidence-based health practice, participatory arts for wellbeing, health + poetry/literature/dance/singing/music/community arts, arts health cost-effectiveness and creative art or creative activity + health/hospital/recovery/mental health
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings Engagement in specially designed arts activities or arts therapies can reduce physical symptoms and improve mental health issues
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings Conclusion: Based on the growing evidence of the arts as a tool for enhancing mental health wellbeing, and in line with the global challenges in health, we suggest that participatory arts activities and clinical arts interventions are made more widely available in health and social settings
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings It is well-documented that such activities can be used as non-medical interventions to promote public health and wellbeing
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings a recent inquiry report from the uk all-party parliamentary group on arts health and wellbeing illustrates the significant impact on personal and public health that participation in activities in a spectrum from clinical arts interventions to non-clinical participatory arts programmes can have
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings furthermore there is a growing international evidence base showing the impact that the arts have on health and wellbeing of communities and individuals
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings furthermore a report from the danish health agency shows that a rising number of people have poor mental health wellbeing
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings there is increasingly focus on mental health illness among young people in scandinavia and the european union has taken the initiative to improve the mental health wellbeing of its member countries
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings the most significant search words used were as follows: arts engagement + health/hospital/recovery arts + hospital/evidence/wellbeing evidence-based health practice participatory arts for wellbeing health + poetry/literature/dance/singing/ music/community arts arts health cost- effectiveness and creative art or creative activity + health/hospital/recovery/mental health
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings results/findings the mental health benefits of participating in arts activities are manifold and to illustrate this we have used examples from the following review categories: arts therapy and participatory arts interventions for various illnesses and diagnoses non-clinical programmes: aop and arts and cultural programmes to enhance mental health of health professionals: arts therapy and participatory arts interventions for various illnesses and diagnoses studies show that arts interventions covering a spectrum from clinical arts interventions over specially designed arts activities with a therapeutic approach to non-clinical participation in arts activities and experiences have both positive and reliable psychological effects for patients within a range of diagnosed illnesses
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings some of the effects were reported as follows: improved ability to cope less negative feeling increased quality of life increased wellbeing reduction in anxiety better understanding of own body reduced agitation positive distractions increased social interaction reduced stress increased selfconfidence and sense of self-worth lower levels of depression increased sense of hope and increased ability to connect with valuable parts of oneself
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings a qualitative study explored whether participation in art and creative activities could increase the subjective wellbeing of women with cancer diagnoses
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings art therapy was also used in a quasi-experimental design study to understand whether this therapy form had a measurable effect on pain and other common symptoms in cancer patients
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings the results show that meaningful creative activity can help activate and boost psychosocial resources such as turning focus towards positive life experiences enhancing self-esteem promoting identity building and creating new opportunities
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings an overview of randomized controlled trails studies that used creative arts therapies cats on cancer patients using pre- and post-intervention measurements showed that cats can lead to reduced anxiety depression and pain symptoms and improved quality of life in cancer patients; however the effect was reduced in follow-ups
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings other studies involving patients with chronic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease copd pain includes a mixed methods study exploring whether participation in a -week-long song project had an effect on respiratory function and self-reported quality of life
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings the qualitative part of the study showed that participants were positive about meeting with other copd patients and had an improvement in wellbeing
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings the study showed that using art therapy could be an important strategy for controlling chronic disease as well as contributing to a feeling of reduced pain and increased wellbeing in women with chronic pain
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings in summary there is good evidence that participation in meaningful creative activities can lead to improved mental health
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings non-clinical programmes: aop there is good and variable documentation and evidence showing that non-clinical engagement in arts culture and creative activities can increase mental health wellbeing of individuals who are experiencing mental health problems
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings the effects are reported as subjective feelings of increased self- confidence and wellbeing being part of a community building new social relationships participating in meaningful activities creating a connection between body and mind promoting relaxation fostering a sense of hope and developing new coping mechanisms and experiencing increased sense of self- worth motivation and aspiration and decreased levels of depression
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings the review of the uk practice indicated that these programmes can contribute to building social capital community involvement improving health and wellbeing
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings participants reported that the programme created a creative and therapeutic environment and that they experienced social psychological and therapeutic activity benefits
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings improvement in the wellbeing of participants with short-term and long- term mental health problems was also found
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings a quantitative study of participants with anxiety depression stress low self- esteem and self-confidence poor wellbeing or chronic illness or pain aimed to understand the process and results of gender relationships progression through intervention and change in wellbeing
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings there is an increased focus on the health and wellbeing of employees especially in workplaces involving caring for other people or providing medical treatment
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings a number of studies about the use and effects of arts and cultural activities to promote wellbeing in healthcare environment have been conducted in recent years
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings despite some methodological limitations in the studies studied it was found that the majority of staff members in the studies felt that engagement in art and cultural activities had a positive impact on health and wellbeing of patients
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings in addition informants felt that arts and cultural activities could improve communication between staff and patients by building and strengthening relationships
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings the review concluded that the predominantly positive perceptions made the staff able to support the implementation of art and cultural activities in the healthcare system and that the majority of reported staff outcomes were positive with arts activities in healthcare setting perceived to have an impact on patients as well as staffs health and wellbeing
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings in order to investigate the correlations between wellbeing indicators for nurses and their participation in cultural events theatre concerts exhibitions museums sightseeing and musicals subjective satisfaction was measured for commitment workplace support for new ideas job satisfaction and the experience of stress
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings the results from the sow study showed increased commitment organizational commitment and self- reported positive changes in relation to the mental health and safety of the participants in comparison with non- participants
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings collective participation in cultural events has a positive impact on commitment at work and can promote aspects of work-related wellbeing
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings symptoms related to burnout and alexithymia the core characteristics of alexithymia are marked dysfunction in emotional awareness social attachment and interpersonal relating as well as self- assessment of health showed an improvement in the intervention group than in controls
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings participants experienced improved health and a reduced level of fatigue
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings based on the growing evidence of engagement in the arts as a tool for enhancing mental health wellbeing and in line with the global health challenges we suggest that arts activities are made more widely available in health and social settings in scandinavia inspired by the results of international studies
View Jensen, A.; Bonde, L.O. The use of arts interventions for mental health and wellbeing in health settings arts activities have been documented as holistic non-medical low-cost interventions with the potential of promoting public mental health and wellbeing
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review With evidence that singing can improve respiratory symptoms, the widespread dissemination of this information through traditional and social media, and the possibility that a patient with respiratory disease might seek out private lessons, the role, if any, a private voice teacher might play in the use of singing as a treatment for respiratory disease was explored
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review with evidence that singing can improve respiratory symptoms the widespread dissemination of this in- formation through traditional and social media and the possibility that a patient with respiratory disease might seek out private lessons the role if any a private voice teacher might play in the use of singing as a treatment for respiratory disease was explored
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review patients in both groups reported a signifi- cant intergroup enhancement in quality of life p =
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review in the second experiment a twice weekly open workshop for singers with any respiratory disease was held in hospital for in- patients day cases and outpatients
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review most participants suggested a perceived physi- cal benefit in breathing physical and psychological health and social well-being
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review canga et al investigated the effect of multimodal psycho- music therapy used in conjunction with pulmonary rehabilitation as compared with pulmonary rehabilitation alone
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review asthma as asthma affects % more aboriginal people than non- aboriginal australians and treatment compliance among aboriginal people is a high priority concern in australia eley and gorman attempted to gain the trust and confidence of ab- original australians by offering a novel treatment plan
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review fur- thermore the treatment offered an opportunity for participants to learn about their disease and management options
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review two participants said they felt tired after the sessions the only reported adverse effect
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review more recently stegemller et al examined the impact of two dosage treatments on the quality of life voice quality and re- spiratory outcome measure of patients with idiopathic parkinson disease
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review multiple sclerosis wiens et al aimed to evaluate music therapys ability to strength- en the breathing muscles by training participants to breathe diaphragmatically and coordinate breath with speech
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review the journals editor commented that qualitative data obtained from the participants show an improvement in quality of life because the exposure to and creation of musical sound gave them a sense of control
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review mendes et al found the kinematics of the respiratory system is highly responsive to voice training
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review respiratory patients may benefit from learning to breathe deeply and control their expiration
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review in many cases patients who are successful- ly taught diaphragmatic and pursed lip breathing increase muscle strength better coordinate the use of their air and believe the training improved their condition
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review second king et al demonstrated in a canine model that pressure oscillations of hz at the chest wall cause the release of acetylcholine stimulating cilia beating and helping to increase mucus flow
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review many studies included open-ended interviews revealing participants perception of singing as an effective therapy that was fun improved mood taught breathing and breath control was a good exercise for the lungs and had improved physical functioning
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review several participants commented on the social benefits of joining a singing group and interacting with other patients or the teacher
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review by attend- ing regular lessons interacting with people sharing history and experience and receiving attention from the instructor participants would naturally benefit in multiple quality of life domains contributing to a possible placebo effect
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review additionally voice teachers may help their students to build confidence foster a sense of accomplishment stimu- late and encourage imagination and also offer musical career mentorship
View Goldenberg, R. B. Singing Lessons for Respiratory Health: A Literature Review benefits range from physical increased respiratory muscle strength reduction of dyspnea and per- ceived respiratory symptoms to psychological improved mood vitality social functioning reduced mental pain and increased overall quality of life
View Ratti, M., Outcome indicators for the cultural sector public benefits: captivation expanded capacity for empathy creation of social bonds pleasure cognitive growth expression of communal meaning
View Ratti, M., Outcome indicators for the cultural sector each of these high level outcomes unpacks into medium-level outcomes such as for individuals: meaning and fulfillment found in engagement in arts and culture measured by access to affordable cultural activities also specifically for disabled or in-care people engagement and participation improved appreciation and/or satisfaction regarding engagement in culture ability to express find meaning and belonging through engagement in cultural activities reporting experienced improvement in quality of life related to engagement development of skills and interests in the cultural areas of interest measured by at least one skill acquired in the past year report developed confidence in an area of culture that interests beneficiaries
View Ratti, M., Outcome indicators for the cultural sector whereas for community sector and society medium-level outcomes are: improved availability to all of high quality affordable accessible and inclusive cultural services strong public awareness of and participation to artistic and cultural activities improved public awareness and engagement improved stakeholder participation eg volunteerism and decision making improved sectoral understanding of how to ameliorate cultural activities and services and how to benefit society policy and expenditures both public and private which support arts and culture improved policies and legislation improved government investment expenditure and procurement
View Ratti, M., Outcome indicators for the cultural sector for instance a strategic line such as educate a diverse public not necessarily competent to listen to music in a way that is enjoyable and interactive goes through actions such as collaboration with schools and concert-lectures conceived for non-musical partners eg schools selection of young artists concert-lectures and performances in the everybody to santa cecilia programme to outputs measurable in principle such as increase in participation increase of musical know- ledge and ability to express oneself through music increased interest in musical culture and activities by firms not in the sector to outcomes such as musical education of the local community or integration of young ar- tists in the professional musical world through practical experience
View Ratti, M., Outcome indicators for the cultural sector museum impacts intrinsic collective museum impacts: access to the past for communities cultural capital contribute new knowledge citizenship enlargement of participation to art forms
View Ratti, M., Outcome indicators for the cultural sector intrinsic individual museum impacts: changed attitudes to science and culture individual cultural empowerment personal learning creative capital enjoyment inspiration creativity
View Ratti, M., Outcome indicators for the cultural sector instrumental collective museum impacts: urban regeneration urban regeneration urban regeneration social cohesion public health community identity attraction of tourists multiplier effect on local economies collective awareness of the importance of culture collective awareness of the importance of culture community empowerment
View Ratti, M., Outcome indicators for the cultural sector instrumental individual museum impacts:community empowerment community empowerment working skills personal skills and personal health creative capital developing attitudes and values
View Chamberlain, D.; Heaps, D.; Robert, I. Bibliotherapy and information prescriptions: a summary of the published evidence‐base and recommendations from past and ongoing Books on Prescription projects f self-help has proven successful in the treatment of depression mild alcohol abuse and anxiety disorders
View Chamberlain, D.; Heaps, D.; Robert, I. Bibliotherapy and information prescriptions: a summary of the published evidence‐base and recommendations from past and ongoing Books on Prescription projects it is most effective when the client is fully participating and helps improve the doctor/patient role
View Chamberlain, D.; Heaps, D.; Robert, I. Bibliotherapy and information prescriptions: a summary of the published evidence‐base and recommendations from past and ongoing Books on Prescription projects the following highlights specific examples where specialist staff and volunteers have provided added value to bop schemes: the use of graduate mental health workers in both devon and doncaster have provided greater interventions with patients and enhanced evaluation and therefore extending overall scope and relevance of the scheme
View Chamberlain, D.; Heaps, D.; Robert, I. Bibliotherapy and information prescriptions: a summary of the published evidence‐base and recommendations from past and ongoing Books on Prescription projects inter- nal evaluation by medical and social care practitioners as well as library staff on how they judged the success of the schemes or the evaluation of patients responses was seen as a key aspect of the overall identification of success or otherwise of i/bop schemes
View Chamberlain, D.; Heaps, D.; Robert, I. Bibliotherapy and information prescriptions: a summary of the published evidence‐base and recommendations from past and ongoing Books on Prescription projects other areas of difficulty included: intensive training requirements of library staff and awareness raising with health professionals stockport doncaster north staffordshire; difficulties of integration of on-line forms with medical software cambridgeshire; unavailability of some recommended titles by health; difficulty of carrying out evaluations with patients because of confidentiality and anonymity issues north staffordshire
View Chamberlain, D.; Heaps, D.; Robert, I. Bibliotherapy and information prescriptions: a summary of the published evidence‐base and recommendations from past and ongoing Books on Prescription projects general practitioners supply patients with mild to medium mental health illness with a book prescription as well as/instead of medication
View Chamberlain, D.; Heaps, D.; Robert, I. Bibliotherapy and information prescriptions: a summary of the published evidence‐base and recommendations from past and ongoing Books on Prescription projects biblio- therapy is a cost-effective treatment that encourages patient participation and encourages partnership working for the statutory bodies
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? there has been growing interest from both local and cen- tral government within britain at least into the impact of cul- tural activities upon health and wellbeing over the last few years windsor ; oneill ; cameron and a planned inquiry into britains national wellbeing will presumably include museums and galleries within the cultural activities investigated
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? while viewing art has been shown to influence physical sen- sations berleant such as decreasing the perceived inten- sity of painful stimuli de tommaso sardaro & livrea and higher scores of life satisfaction and health status reported by hospital patients after a handling session with museum objects chatterjee vreeland & noble within this research unless stated otherwise when wellbeing is discussed it is in rela- tion to mental wellbeing
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? improvements of positive affect which boost mental wellbeing in general can also improve cognitive process- es such as problem solving and social interaction ashby et al
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? while research conducted within non-museum environments has illustrated that art and museum artefacts can influence per- ceived wellbeing both physical and mental de tommaso et al
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? the stai has been used extensively within other areas of research such as to examine the impact of stress and anxiety upon learning and performance and provides a measure of the partici- pants current state of anxiety sai as well as their trait level of anxiety tai which shows what they consider normal for them- selves spielberger
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? participant reported in both sessions that his initial anxiety state before viewing the art was higher than what he would consider normal tai but in both sessions he reported a decrease in his current level of anxi- ety to below his trait level
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? although there was not a significant change in the level of anxiety experienced after viewing the artworks with the excep- tion of participant all participants in each session experienced a reduction in anxiety
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? it was also suggested that wellbeing was a long term feeling rather than an immediate emotive type reaction
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? participants from all three groups agreed that it was and several also stated that it was likely to incorporate other factors such as personality expectations prior experiences and knowledge how visitors felt that day as well as methods of display interpretation and the state of upkeep of the museum building
View Binnie, J. Does Viewing Art in the Museum Reduce Anxiety and Improve Wellbeing? this positive experience for museums and art gallery visitors suggests that as well as being seen as educational or enjoyable places to visit that the well-known idea that they are spaces of calm within a busy world can be true and as such museums and art galleries can be seen as places beneficial to personal wellbeing
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts This study aims to identify the social role of heritage conservation in urban renewal
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts heritage conservation can enrich people s under- standing of their community english heritage
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts through public involvement social networks and cohesion can be developed
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts conservation of heritage sites can help develop the place- specic character of urban regions swensen and improve the physical conditions of the environment while maintaining and enhancing local life and culture and the uniqueness of a place strange & whitney
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts the heritage conservation projects have inevitably destroyed social networks and the sense of community
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts it is a district with rich cultural traditions and heritage buildings
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts the survey helped to provide valuable insight into the social effects of heritage conservation in urban renewal districts
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts this factor consists of eight items related to enhancing social interaction and social networks
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts in addition the revitalized heritage buildings can help people continue their daily social lives
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts this factor mainly concerns public awareness of local heritage and traditional industries
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts more programmes and activities should be generated after revitalization and the diversity of community life enhanced
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts moreover feelings of attachment help inhabitants nd their roots and strengthen their sense of local identity belonging and security
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts in addition better accessibility to heritage buildings could elicit better public participation
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts moreover as part of the urban renewal strategy promoting public awareness of local heritage and the preservation of traditional industries is essential for achieving more successful heritage conservation
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts third promote public aware- ness of local heritage and traditional industries through better public education such as organizing guided tours workshops and exhibitions to showcase the histories of the heritage buildings and traditional businesses in the districts
View Yung, E., H. K.; Zhang, Q., ; Chan, E., H. Underlying social factors for evaluating heritage conservation in urban renewal districts with the implementation of responsive policies and the orga- nization of community events and activities heritage conservation can enhance social interaction and social networks enrich collec- tive memory and create cultural identity cultural diversity and sense of community
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. The findings also indicate even less frequent engagement in activities exhibiting cultural characteristics, e
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. these include learning benefits generated through engagement in the arts increased community cohesion and potential health benefits ie application of the arts in the treatment of depression and mental/physical benefits of sport and recreational fitness
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. findings revealed that the positive effect of engagement in cultural activities increases with the frequency of engagement
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. they found well-being to be enhanced as musical performances are therapeutic in the broadest sense providing immersion in the performance through the act of performing for the performer and emotional effects for the audience
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. report positive effects from active music-making among the elderly which provides a sense of purpose autonomy and social interaction
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. individuals participating in these activities receive an increased sense of well-being derived from physical fitness kavetsos and improved mental stimulation and satisfaction in part associated with enhanced social networks gratton
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. found that being active is particularly beneficial for older individuals
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. the ordered probit models provide evidence in support of the suggested positive leisure experience generated from arts culture and sport
View Wheatley, D.; Bickerton, C. Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport. positive leisure experience is derived from participation in arts culture and sport evident in greater satisfaction with life and leisure and general happiness;
View Węziak-Białowolska, D.; Białowolski, P. Cultural events – does attendance improve health? Evidence from a Polish longitudinal study the first that more fre- quent cultural event participation had a positive causal influence on self-reported health h and the second that more frequent cultural event participation decreased preva- lence of ill-health h
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs Published evidence for the role of participatory art in supporting health and wellbeing is growing
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs We found that Arts on Prescription had a positive impact on participants
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs Qualitative findings indicated that the program provided challenging artistic activities which created a sense of purpose and direction, enabled personal growth and achievement, and empowered participants, in a setting which fostered the development of meaningful relationships with others
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs additional health information about participants considered relevant by referrers included the following conditions: lung disease eg copd asthma bronchiec- tasis cardiac disease diabetes venous insufficiency osteoporosis stroke parkinsons disease joint replacements back pain and mo- bi ity issues
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs specia requirements impacting program participation identified by participants themselves focussed on mobility concerns poor balance fear of falling limitations in walking distance needing assistance to stand and being unable to stand for long periods of time poor vision and hearing loss
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs maintaining brain health was also identified with participants want- ing to stay positive and slow memory loss q-o and to keep my brain active qz
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs participants indicated that art created a shared interest which facilitated connection between people and the development of friendships and one group unprompted reported meeting outside the program for coffee
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs fg focus group interviews suggested that the artists p ayed an impor- tant role in creating and supporting participant autonomy through working in partnership with participants and supporting the artistic process with constructive encouragement and formal recognition
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs while the role of arts and health through creative participatory or recep- tive interventions has recently been acknowledged by the australian government through its nationa arts and hea th framework indi- cating a supportive policy climate australian government it was our experience that health practitioner knowledge of participa- tory art as a non-medical intervention alongside existing treatments for patients is limited
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs increases in the level of self-reported creativity and self-reported frequency of creative activities suggest that aop was both nurturing participants sense of creativity and authorising its practice
View Poulos, R.G.; Marwood, S.; Harkin, D.; Opher, S.; Clift, S.; Cole, A.M.D.; Rhee, J.; Beilharz, K.; Poulos, C.J. Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs we suggest future researchers consider the inclusion of measures to capture changes in chronic respiratory symptoms and functional ability
View Backman, M., ; Nilsson, P., The role of cultural heritage in attracting skilled individuals throsby interprets cultural heritages as local public goods that generate positive spillover effects through their esthetic authentic and historical values which are intrinsic to their location
View Backman, M., ; Nilsson, P., The role of cultural heritage in attracting skilled individuals our findings indicate that several local level predictors play an important role in explaining growth in human capital
View Bygren, L.O.; Konlaan, B.B.; Johansson, S.E. Attendance at cultural events, reading books or periodicals, and making music or singing in a choir as determinants for survival: Swedish interview survey of living conditions And we know that the organism responds with changes in the humoral nervous systemfor example, verbal expression of traumatic experiences through writing or talking improves physical health, enhances immune function, and is associated with fewer medical visits
View Bygren, L.O.; Konlaan, B.B.; Johansson, S.E. Attendance at cultural events, reading books or periodicals, and making music or singing in a choir as determinants for survival: Swedish interview survey of living conditions Negative effects of cultural activities could be that people lose their sense of reality and identify with asocial models of behaviour and are themselves encouraged towards asocial behaviour
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing Research has demonstrated that involvement with mainstream performing arts, such as music and dance, can boost wellbeing
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing this program aimed to teach patients magic tricks to enhance their wellbeing motivation and self-esteem
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing spencers healing of magic initiative involved magicians teaching simple magic tricks to promote patients physical and psychological wellbeing
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing this initiative involves training health practitioners to deliver one-on-one magic therapy for paediatric patients and their families and aims to help reduce the stress that children often experience in hospital
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing the college aims to create a positive and caring environment that helps children to build a range of life skills along with eight specific star qualities honesty respect responsibility initiative excellence empathy humility and wonder
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing in kevin spencer built on his healing of magic initiative by launching hocus focus an educational curriculum that involves magic-based lesson plans designed to promote students motivation and key learning skills including individuals with learning and emotional challenges spencer
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing so learning magic may help to develop teamwork skills including learning to give and receive constructive feedback identifying individuals strengths and helping to build community
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing forty patients completed the purdue pegboard a standard test of manual dexterity and bimanual coordination before and after participating in the magic-based intervention
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing six patients completed a questionnaire about the benefits of learning magic with the results showing that they found the experience highly sociable refreshing pleasant and meaningful
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing sui & suis study described above also examined whether a magic-based intervention improved patients psychological wellbeing
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing patients indicated that their cognitive skills including memory concentration and ability to think rationally had improved and that the intervention boosted their confidence and acted as a catalyst for conversation
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing the teachers reported that the intervention captured and held students attention encouraged active participation emphasized the importance of following directions and encouraged students to help one another
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing the students appeared to show increases in concentration and memory skills self-determination and self- esteem motivation and participation leadership and socialization peer relationships and collaboration
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing three main benefits emerged: its okay to be me parents believing that their children experienced a strong sense of inclusion and insight the magic effect valuing the novelty and challenge of performing magic tricks and i can do it increased self-belief and a willingness to attempt challenging tasks
View Wiseman, R.; Watt, C. Achieving the impossible: a review of magic-based interventions and their effects on wellbeing the literature suggests that learning to perform magic ticks can help promote both physical and psychological wellbeing
View Conceição, L. S. R.; Neto, M. G.; Amaral, M. A. S.; Martins-Filho, P. R. S.; Carvalho, V. O. Effect of dance therapy on blood pressure and exercise capacity of individuals with hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis Dance therapy is a less conventional modality of physical activity in cardiovascular rehabilitation, which is positively linked to cognitive, emotional and social integration of the participants
View Conceição, L. S. R.; Neto, M. G.; Amaral, M. A. S.; Martins-Filho, P. R. S.; Carvalho, V. O. Effect of dance therapy on blood pressure and exercise capacity of individuals with hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis methods: pubmed scopus lilacs ibecs medline and scielo via virtual health library bireme from the earliest data available to february for controlled trials that investigated the effects of dance therapy on exercise capacity systolic sbp and diastolic dbp blood pressure in hypertensive patients
View Conceição, L. S. R.; Neto, M. G.; Amaral, M. A. S.; Martins-Filho, P. R. S.; Carvalho, V. O. Effect of dance therapy on blood pressure and exercise capacity of individuals with hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis a negative effect size indicated that dance therapy was effective in reducing blood pressure
View Conceição, L. S. R.; Neto, M. G.; Amaral, M. A. S.; Martins-Filho, P. R. S.; Carvalho, V. O. Effect of dance therapy on blood pressure and exercise capacity of individuals with hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis dance therapy is an intervention positively associated with cognitive emotional and social integration of the individuals []
View Conceição, L. S. R.; Neto, M. G.; Amaral, M. A. S.; Martins-Filho, P. R. S.; Carvalho, V. O. Effect of dance therapy on blood pressure and exercise capacity of individuals with hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis in individuals with parkinson s disease dance therapy also improved exercise capacity and quality of life []
View Conceição, L. S. R.; Neto, M. G.; Amaral, M. A. S.; Martins-Filho, P. R. S.; Carvalho, V. O. Effect of dance therapy on blood pressure and exercise capacity of individuals with hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis it is possible that the cultural identication so- cial involvement and the music can play an important role on several outcomes such as patients motivation exercise intensity and blood pressure response
View Conceição, L. S. R.; Neto, M. G.; Amaral, M. A. S.; Martins-Filho, P. R. S.; Carvalho, V. O. Effect of dance therapy on blood pressure and exercise capacity of individuals with hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis moreover the assessment of exercise capacity and the -hours ambulatory blood pressure measurement would be interesting to clarify the circadian behavior of blood pressure and corre- late the magnitude of blood pressure lowering with improvements on exercise capacity of individuals in a dance therapy
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review Music interventions may be particularly well suited to addressing risk factors in young people and reducing juvenile crime
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review these young people present complex health and social needs arising from experiences of emotional trauma violence and abuse drug and alcohol misuse peer pressure and gang-related activities poor parenting family rejection and lack of struc- tured home environments lader et al
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review all participants also attended a weekly comparison psycho-educational group therapy session hip-hop therapy group met weekly for weeks to discuss and compose rap lyrics and practice freestyle rapping conditions included musical performance only performance plus cognitive strategies cognitive strategies only vicarious experience and control condition of no intervention pre- and post-assessment of emotion locus of control self-esteem and dyslexia using descriptive statistics comparing pre- and post-measures including standard deviation within and between groups
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review music pro- gramme participants showed significant improvements in school/work role performance depression and mood negative self-evaluation and anger
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review other data reveal a decrease in behaviour-related incidents ie breaking prison rules for the music group alone as well as increased engagement with education during and after the project for the music and art groups with the largest increase in the music group
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review rap therapy was vastly pre- ferred by participants regardless of background with significant differences favouring rap therapy observed in relation to prosocial skills development as well as levels of relaxation en- joyment and excitement about upcoming meet- ings
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review they observed participants improved or- ganizational skills and the sense of purpose achievement and identity they derived from producing a music cd
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review it also developed participants capacity to reflect on their behaviour
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review activities such as rap battles pro- vided an acceptable outlet for aggression and enabled participants to demonstrate their skills gain respect and learn humility
View Daykin, N.; De Viggiani, N.; Pilkington, P.; Moriarty, Y. Music making for health, well-being and behaviour change in youth justice settings: a systematic review it also identifies key issues for the development of practice and further research
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. while the archive domain occupies a more restricted professional arena than its library and museum counterparts increases in usage levels have placed archive services in a position to demonstrate the impact and relevance of archives in both social and economic terms
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. demographic profile government policy initiatives such as social inclusion and cultural diversity have highlighted the importance of profiling the demographic base of usage
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. characterise this as follows noting that: there is a clear distinction between an immediate response to an output and the impact continuum which progresses beyond the immediate interaction through an intermediate and longer term response eg a person reads becomes employed contributes to social cohesion
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. in their wider study of the available evidence for impact evaluation identify four complex inter-related areas three of which they define in terms of types of impact: social learning and economic together with a fourth related dimension of access which they consider as the provision of opportunity whether physical emotional or intellectual to accommodate learning social or economic wellbeing
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. note how museums are viewed as essential to building a sense of community identity by undertaking projects that facilitate interaction between individuals and help build social networks
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. also recognises involvement in community-based initiatives as helping individuals develop the skills and confidence to be more involved in the community leading in some cases to improved understanding and links across ethnic and social divides
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. mlas learning impact research project lirp for example set out to develop an understanding of learning and its outcomes and to establish a way of researching and providing evidence of this learning in museums archives and libraries
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. swmlac: south west museums archives and libraries social impact audit report bryson usherwood & streatfield detailing the findings of a project to assess the collaborative impact of the alm sector in the south west in terms of promoting social cohesion fostering social inclusion and encouraging lifelong learning
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. evidence from focus groups demonstrated both a lack of understanding of archives and recognition of their potential role in linking future generations to the stories of today cultural diversity / identity
View Horton, S., ; Spence, J., Scoping the economic and social impact of archives. a critique of the social impact of museums and galleries as agents of social inclusion newman & mclean used qualitative research semi-structured interviews with policymakers local and national and key practitioners
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. opened in the hospital has provided basic medical care and services to the people of brandon and the surrounding area
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. skills and education required by employees in growing industries have increased significantly
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. people within a community can share their knowledge and experience with one another to create community-wide networks of information
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. community archives can play a significant role in the development of such networks as a major information hub in their communities
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. linkages between recreation leisure and the arts and business could improve funding for arts and recreation and assist artists and recreational groups in developing their public profile
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. in the united kingdom the national council on archives community archives development group cadg provides an example of how an archival organization can play a leadership role in the cultivation of relationships between local archivists and archival users that can be beneficial to both groups
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. particularly in small communities with limited resources it is useful for community organizations to work together on development projects because each organization participating in the initiative can contribute resources and knowledge archives and archivists can potentially contribute to multi-organizational development projects by using their holdings and knowledge to support community initiatives in a variety of areas such as culture education history and social justice
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. essentially cultural institutions generate social capital
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. bradley suggests that archives can play a role in facilitating healthy remembrance
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. archives as keepers of the public memory can play a significant role in facilitating access to information
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. in allegations of misuse of public funds through the federal sponsorship program caused serious concern about government accountability
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. archives have the ability to add value to community development projects
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. capital investments have increased as a result of growing reliance on machinery the number of farmers has fallen significantly and government policy has come to play an increasingly important role in operational and marketing activities
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. detailed data about the environment can also play a role in brandons local emergency response planning
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. the social capital generated by archives can also contribute to the development of pride heritage and respect
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. brandons inventory of cultural resources shows that although the city plays an important role in supporting local multicultural and artistic activities it does very little to support the development of brandons historical initiatives
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. in brandon a cooperative approach to archiving could involve partnerships between a community archives and existing local organizations
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. technologies greater public input into or interaction with archival activities
View Richards, I., Archives as a cornerstone of community growth: developing community archives in Brandon, Manitoba. community archives have the capacity to act as centres of local knowledge providing a resource that the citizens of brandon can use to participate in the knowledge-based economy and support many other aspects of community well being
View Spiegel, J., B.; Parent, S., N. Re-approaching community development through the arts: a ‘critical mixed methods’ study of social circus in Quebec. Community arts projects have long been used in community development
View Spiegel, J., B.; Parent, S., N. Re-approaching community development through the arts: a ‘critical mixed methods’ study of social circus in Quebec. many participants reported that social circus helped them to become less shy or taught them to trust
View Spiegel, J., B.; Parent, S., N. Re-approaching community development through the arts: a ‘critical mixed methods’ study of social circus in Quebec. circus giving motivation to accomplish something and meaning to their life was recurrent in participants discourse
View Spiegel, J., B.; Parent, S., N. Re-approaching community development through the arts: a ‘critical mixed methods’ study of social circus in Quebec. participants from drummondville experienced greater personal growth and social inclusion than participants from both montreal and sherbrooke; quebec city participants as well as those from drummondville indicated greater social engagement
View Spiegel, J., B.; Parent, S., N. Re-approaching community development through the arts: a ‘critical mixed methods’ study of social circus in Quebec. through paying attention to their bodies participants gained sensory experience of the value of remaining alert and altering their everyday habits both in order to be proficient performers and to facilitate certain kinds of social interac- tions
View Stern, M., J. Measuring the Outcomes of Creative Placemaking the social impact of the arts project s approach over the past two decades the university of pennsylvania s social impact of the arts project siap has worked to develop meth ods and data to study the ways that the arts and culture influence urban neighborhoods
View Stern, M., J. Measuring the Outcomes of Creative Placemaking we use geographic information systems to then link cultural data to other measures of social wellbeing in order to study the arts social impact we supplement our quantitative and spatial analysis with interviews and obser vational data to both generate hypotheses for testing and validate and give depth to our findings
View Stern, M., J. Measuring the Outcomes of Creative Placemaking despite this association social connections have a stronger influence on other dimen sions of social wellbeing in low-income neighborhoods
View Stern, M., J. Measuring the Outcomes of Creative Placemaking for example in the case of social stress which tracks birth outcomes teen pregnan cies homicide deaths and reports of child abuse and neglect economic wellbeing and the cultural asset index each had a strong association with lower rates of social stress in the poorest percent of block groups
View Stern, M., J. Measuring the Outcomes of Creative Placemaking our research on the role of culture as a dimension of social wellbeing includ ing development of neighborhood-based indexes of wellbeing is still in its early stages
View Stern, M., J. Measuring the Outcomes of Creative Placemaking the arts and culture continue to have a demonstrable impact on measures of social wellbeing in philadelphia particularly in the city s least advantaged areas
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts distinctive urban areas that combine a rich cultural life with compelling public spaces and architecture they have been recognized for their strategic value in defining urban character and identity; improving livability; attracting investment knowledge workers and tourists; and building community
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts increasingly that mission includes some kind of social impact; to build a sense of community inclusion cohesion and civic pride through arts and cultural participation
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts this includes what are sometimes seen as instrumental social objectives such as health and social inclusion but also embrace social impacts fundamentally linked to the character of cultural experience such as reflectiveness understanding people from other the report identifies clear opportunities for cultural districts to enlarge the way they think about social impact as well as for collaboration to enhance their practice and develop methods of evaluation
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts this includes what are seen as instrumental social objectives such as health or social inclusion but they also embrace social impacts more fundamentally linked to cultural engagement such as reflectiveness understanding people from other backgrounds community cohesiveness imagination and innovation
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts it is tasked with creating a lively atmosphere through public realm improvements and cultural activities such as festivals and performance spaces that link the theatre arts centre and symphony hall as well as housing the design studios and media start-ups that help energise the district
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts toledo museum of art has a role in the citys master plan which emphasises the role of arts and culture in bringing people back to the downtown core and getting young professionals to live in or around it
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts cultures role in strengthening links between people and increasing social capital is what matters in such communities rather than direct economic impact
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts this socially-engaged arts practice reaches into many areas: health and especially mental health sustaining cognitive and social capabilities in ageing loneliness amongst older people supporting those living with a dementia and their care providers helping offenders begin the process of change necessary for desistance from crime and outreach programmes for motivation and skills development in school education
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts one of the most significant contributions lies in the ability of arts and culture to help shape reflective individuals facilitating greater understanding of themselves and their lives empathy with respect to others and an appreciation of the diversity of human experience and cultures
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts it is also the foundation for the relationship of arts and culture to civic agency and engagement
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts toledo museum of arts presence in downtown toledo aims to raise environmental awareness and debate most recently through wendy gus art installation about the blue-green algae bloom in lake erie that affected the citys water supply
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts alserkal avenues thematic homegrown programmes host debates around key contemporary issues while concrete one of the most significant contributions lies in the ability of arts and culture to help shape reflective individuals facilitating greater understanding of themselves and their lives empathy with respect to others and an appreciation of the diversity of human experience and cultures
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts a vibrant public realm is the key social objective of qds and its vision highlights a safe and balanced district the linking of neighbourhoods the street as a connecting thread that draws people through experiences and artistic expression in the public space
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts learning focuses on developing the link between creative learning and social mobility among londons young people while communities led by the lso and working across the project provides arts participation opportunities for residents within the city and adjacent boroughs
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts acms objective to promote health and wellbeing within the arts sector itself is distinctive and something on which it leads a consortium of victoria cultural organisations
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts social impact as defined by creative state unpacks as improved education better health and wellbeing community strength and crime prevention
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts nonetheless the priorities in the plan are broad and connect with much of the social impact typology above: developing community-based work in neighbourhoods creating vibrant public spaces enhancing civic pride and engagement fostering inclusiveness and participation building social capital and supporting the creative industries
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts sccp opened in to preserve the heritage of the factory and its central courtyards and transform it into a dynamic creative hub combining artistic and cultural practice creative industries and an engaged visitor experience
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts design provides one bridge between the public-facing and creative industries dimension of the hub through its role in creative production in shaping the brand identities that are part of the support sccp provides and in a programme to support design students to establish viable creative projects
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts big data will help institutions understand audiences and participants with data linkage helping cultural organisations acquire new knowledge and tailor products to public demand
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts the cdn has worked closely with the national local government cultural forum to develop tools that relate inputs and outputs of cultural activity to outcomes defined as individual wellbeing social connectedness feeling valued sense of safety and bridging social differences
View Crossick, G., The Social Impact of Cultural Districts the relationship between peoples wellbeing and participation in arts and cultural activities is to be increasingly found in how the cultural sector talks about its impact
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. arts participation is being redefined as people increasingly choose to engage with art in new more active and expressive ways
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. arts learning or arts education: the boundary between participatory arts practice and arts learning ie acquisition of artistic skills is blurry
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. in cities and towns across the united states participatory arts practice is gaining recognition as an important aspect of quality of life and a means of building civic identity and communal meaning
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. the value of the arts in this participatory culture is its ability to connect people through shared experiences and to contribute to vibrant livable communities
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. their model asserts cultural literacy as the foundation of a healthy cultural ecology supporting higher levels of engagement such as participatory cultural practice and consumption of professional cultural goods and services
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. have added fuel to the fire of participatory arts practice as typified by performance flashmobs and giving rise to a new family of digital arts projects such as the australia council for the arts what makes me website which aims to build australias largest collaborative digital story
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. do adults involved in active arts programs experience the same benefits as children
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. arts groups are devoting a great deal of energy these days to assisting visitors and audiences in having deeper more meaningful arts experiences ie enhanced engagement
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. theater music dance and storytelling programs that involve audience members in an artistic capacity also qualify project such as when the cincinnati opera sends its singers into local churches to rehearse and perform in gospel music concerts
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. comprises interactive web-based programs that encourage and facilitate creative expression
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. involves artists and companies that build participation and interactivity into their creative processes
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. events build community vitality and public support for the arts
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. putting those findings into practice artswave created the annual tada a participatory public art event designed to broaden public support of the arts through the act of creating and integrating art into the fabric of the community
View Brown, A., S.; Novak-Leonard, J., L.; Gilbride, S., Getting in on the act: How arts groups are creating opportunities for active participation. artswave also fosters active participation through its interactive website
View Arikan, Y., ; Clark, T., N.; Noonan, D., S.; Tolley, G., The arts, Bohemian scenes, and income. key to success is sensitivity to the local context by arts activists and policymakers as illustrated in the diver- sity of local arts lifestyle and social background connections detailed in silver lee and childress and brown-saracino
View Stern, M., J.; Seifert, S., C. Cultural Clusters: The Implications of Cultural Assets Agglomeration for Neighborhood Revitalization Cultural districts have attracted increased attention as an urban economic development strategy
View Stern, M., J.; Seifert, S., C. Cultural Clusters: The Implications of Cultural Assets Agglomeration for Neighborhood Revitalization in addition cultural clusters tend to experience an increase in population a rise in housing values and a decrease in poverty rates with little evidence of ethnic displacement
View Stern, M., J.; Seifert, S., C. Cultural Clusters: The Implications of Cultural Assets Agglomeration for Neighborhood Revitalization artists have become social entrepreneurs selling their vision as well as their wares
View Stern, M., J.; Seifert, S., C. Cultural Clusters: The Implications of Cultural Assets Agglomeration for Neighborhood Revitalization the combination of cultural assets social networks locational advantage andultimatelypublic intervention enabled old city to achieve its current status as an arts and entertainment destination social impact of the arts project
View Stern, M., J.; Seifert, S., C. Cultural Clusters: The Implications of Cultural Assets Agglomeration for Neighborhood Revitalization second the social impact of the arts project has compiled an extensive body of evi- dence that links concentrations of cultural activities and par- ticipants with positive spillover effects on the immediate community
View Stern, M., J.; Seifert, S., C. Cultural Clusters: The Implications of Cultural Assets Agglomeration for Neighborhood Revitalization a chicago study found that community-based arts activities create links to regional resources by attracting local and non-local customers to neighborhood businesses and by hiring artists from out- side the neighborhood to work with local residents grams and warr
View Serafinelli, M., ; Tabellini, G., Creativity Over Time and Space i shocks to the local supply of talented and creative individuals such as due to education or to a political and social environment that encourages innovation or wars and negative shocks eg
View Serafinelli, M., ; Tabellini, G., Creativity Over Time and Space being close to other creative individuals could increase individual productivity through learning exchange of ideas or role model effects
View Rosenstein, C., Cultural development and city neighborhoods. public library branches school arts programs historic houses and sites public parks and community centers are important cultural assets in neighborhoods as are smaller cultural sector businesses such as galleries dance and artist studios and independent and used book music and video stores
View Rosenstein, C., Cultural development and city neighborhoods. local arts commissions or ofces of arts and cultural affairs serve the nonprot sector by providing grants and technical assistance to nonprot arts organizations advocating for increased public and private funding for the arts and art education and marketing local arts organizations and smaller local arts businesses such as galleries and theater companies
View Rosenstein, C., Cultural development and city neighborhoods. the nations mayors urge the creation of a cabinet level secretary of culture and tourism charged with forming a national policy for arts culture and tourism
View Leonard, M., Exhibiting Popular Music: Museum Audiences, Inclusion and Social History museums have responded through the development of policies and implementation of sta training monitoring progress through visitor feedback and access audits martin
View Leonard, M., Exhibiting Popular Music: Museum Audiences, Inclusion and Social History in the uk policy guidance from the department of culture media and sport dcms has gone further than encouraging museums to expand their audiences recom- mending that they should play an active role in combating social exclusion and so act as agents of social change in the community dcms p
View Leonard, M., Exhibiting Popular Music: Museum Audiences, Inclusion and Social History the changing emphasis within the museum sector on outreach social inclusion and engagement has arguably made museums more receptive to displays of and engagement with popular culture
View Leonard, M., Exhibiting Popular Music: Museum Audiences, Inclusion and Social History as visitor surveys conducted for museums libraries archives partnership mla have shown a primary factor inuencing peoples decision to visit a museum is their general interest in the subject of the museum or the collections on display ipsos mori p
View Leonard, M., Exhibiting Popular Music: Museum Audiences, Inclusion and Social History has shown learning within a museum is strongly inuenced by emotion motivation and personal interest
View Leonard, M., Exhibiting Popular Music: Museum Audiences, Inclusion and Social History their emotional engagement with the exhibits along with physical and cognitive engagement with various inter- active elements will work to aid their learning building on the knowledge that they already have
View Walmsley, B., Deep hanging out in the arts: an anthropological approach to capturing cultural value as this study aimed to capture and elucidate the phenomenology of lived cultural experiences to explore the role that the arts and culture might play in enabling people to live out their identities in the world and coexist with other people an anthropological approach seemed to be the most appropriate
View Walmsley, B., Deep hanging out in the arts: an anthropological approach to capturing cultural value when reecting on the word emporium a participatory open mic night of spoken word and music kim noted that the arts can provide detachment and release a platform for people to re-tell or re-conceive their stories and move on
View Walmsley, B., Deep hanging out in the arts: an anthropological approach to capturing cultural value both gillian and milan referred to the signicant role that their deep hanging out with their research partner played in helping them appreciate the value that the arts brings to their lives
View Walmsley, B., Deep hanging out in the arts: an anthropological approach to capturing cultural value hanging out with our participants conrmed the positive role the arts can play in promoting positive men- tal health and wellbeing and reected schopenhauers vision of the arts as a source of release and refuge from the anguish of everyday life
View Walmsley, B., Deep hanging out in the arts: an anthropological approach to capturing cultural value kim argued that the arts help people communicate on a deeper level
View Walmsley, B., Deep hanging out in the arts: an anthropological approach to capturing cultural value by taking a more ecological perspective arts organisa- tions could assist their audiences to navigate their individual and collective arts ecologies more meaningfully
View Grodach, C., Museums as Urban Catalysts: The Role of Urban Design in Flagship Cultural Development the research shows that certain urban design characteristics can negatively affect the ability of a project to attract visitors and generate commercial activity
View Grodach, C., Museums as Urban Catalysts: The Role of Urban Design in Flagship Cultural Development the work reveals how changes in museum design and function have accompanied their rise as catalytic projects and the associated pressure on museums to maintain their larger more spectacular buildings store their expanded collections and market their blockbuster exhibitions
View Grodach, C., Museums as Urban Catalysts: The Role of Urban Design in Flagship Cultural Development further in the museum enacted a policy of free admission that has significantly diversified and increased its annual attendance san jose museum of art
View Cortés-Rico, L., ; Piedrahita-Solórzano, G., Participatory Design in Practice. The Case of an Embroidered Technology. actively involving communities facilitates their empowerment their appropriation of designed artifacts and also makes possible the local development of new sustainable social technology
View Badham, M., Cultural Indicators: Tools for Community Engagement? while quality of life indexes and community wellbeing indicators promise opportunity for evidence based policy making and democratic participation they assume their respective policy frameworks are relevant and ethical
View Badham, M., Cultural Indicators: Tools for Community Engagement? one indicator of community cohesion aims to maximize community involvement and serve as inspiration for action smiles per hour
View Badham, M., Cultural Indicators: Tools for Community Engagement? smiling encourages people to feel more connected with each other and safer so it reduces fear of crime an important element in the quality of life of many neighborhoods
View Badham, M., Cultural Indicators: Tools for Community Engagement? many initiatives within a larger framework of community wellbeing marginalizes the role of culture into numbers of people who attend art galleries and operas to a broader understanding of cultures role in develop- ment
View Badham, M., Cultural Indicators: Tools for Community Engagement? the research suggests that engaging community in things that really matter can stimulate positive social change
View Kubey, K., Design for Impact: Measuring Architecture's Social Value in the United States. building on the department of city planning s urban design principles which advanced the idea that good urban design can promote social equity by being open and accessible to everyone the pdc developed affordable housing guiding principles to set high standards for design in all neighbourhoods
View Kubey, K., Design for Impact: Measuring Architecture's Social Value in the United States. z +#; enterprise community partners enterprise community partners the national non-profit organisation that invests in affordable housing and provides technical assistance to local housing providers pushes for social outcomes through tools like its green communities criteria a checklist of mandatory and optional features of the design process and resulting building from designing for the health of the residents to locating housing near public transport to specifying environmentally friendly materials
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. it serves to create an aesthetic an atmosphere and ultimately shapes the attractiveness of places
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. cultural investment and cultural workers influence the attractiveness of places cities and regions the spirit and morale of people as well as being the focus of policies whether social cohesion entrepreneurship wellbeing or investment
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. this will promote: - links between innovation and cultural policy artists and creatives to encourage innovation across the city and to encourage this by linking digital and tech hubs with cultural and creative hubs; - use of heritage and memory to build self-awareness self-worth and social cohesion this will build strong social values and help combat xenophobia racism anti- semitism gender discrimination and extreme nationalism; - empowerment of people through artist and design-led education living labs and cocreation methodologies; - capacity building to enable quality local cultural expression audience development and participation; - intercultural dialogues and positive proactive approaches to managing cultural integration; - the fight against social inequality in urban and rural contexts by stimulating cultural entrepreneurship and better management of local cultural resources to maximise participation and ownership from citizens
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. culture is more than ever a tool to address local and global challenges to connect people to innovate to acquire knowledge or to generate intercultural dialogue and collaboration ultimately leading to more peaceful and united societies
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. changing citizens perceptions of urban spaces through artistic interventions to encourage ownership civic pride and urban regeneration
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. cities build their uniqueness on cultural resources and assets every place has cultural resources
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. local cultural resources include cultural institutions and organisations tangible and intangible heritage festivals and cultural events ccis as well as artists and creative professionals such as designers architects and communication professionals
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. managing cultural resources is a far cry from a top-down process and many participants in the culture for cities and regions project brilliantly demonstrated that great involvement of stakeholders and even end-users can be achieved to deliver on city objectives
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. - den gamle by open air museum with the development of a joint project with people with a migrant background
View Cultures for Cities and Regions , R., Future creative cities. Why culture is a smart investment in cities. peer-learning activities facilitate the exchange of experience between cities and regions and strengthen cooperation on cultural policies
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. it can foster income generation job creation and export earnings while promoting social inclusion cultural diversity and human development
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. following the dcmss report the european union identified cultural sectors as an essential feature of a post-industrial economy and illustrated the impact of culture and creativity in the development of new products and services including public services driving technological innovation stimulating research optimising human resources branding and communicating values inspiring people to learn and building communities kea p
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. while in developing countries see eg south american and south african countries the focus is predominantly on cultural heritage maintenance and poverty alleviation and notions of creative and cultural industries are promoted to evolve policies to support the creative economy as it contributes to the creation of jobs empowering youth and women as well as addressing the challenges of social inclusion unctad the policy discourse around cultural and creative industries in developed countries shifts the emphasis on issues linked with intellectual property right and culture as a driver of economic growth and social inclusion
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. second culture can promote social cohesion and foster social inclusion
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. as throsby suggests culture and creativity are pervasive and play an integrating role in nurturing community identity creativity cohesion and vitality
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. cultural and creative activities have proven to be successful means of fostering education forming the social attitudes and behaviour of children unctad as well as engaging peoples imagination and creativity in schools in colleges and universities and in lifelong learning kea
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. moreover education and learning play a fundamental role in shaping a creative environment
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. in light of the positive impact of culture and creative industries in the areas of employment growth social inclusion education diversity environment and digitalization along with the overall economic impact on growth and gdp policy makers are shaping policy at national regional and local level towards policies that foster the creative economy
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. the study illustrates the impact of culture in the development of new products and services driving technological innovation stimulating research optimising human resources branding and communicating values inspiring people to learn and building communities defining culture-based creativity as an essential feature of a post-industrial economy kea p
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. in order to emerge culture-based creativity needs personal abilities technical skills a social environment that is a social context where education and learning are encouraged and creativity is valued both artistically and economically p
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. as kea notes in the framework of the implementation of the [european cultural] agenda the ministers of culture of the eu member states have highlighted the role of culture in boosting creativity and innovation in europe and recognized that a strategic investment in culture as well as in cultural and creative industries was vital for strengthening a dynamic creative society and creating jobs in the european union kea p
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. as stated by the european commission culture plays a pivotal role in addressing key societal and economic challenges and has a strong role in driving innovation economic growth and job creation b p
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. promoted culture as a potential contributor to social inclusion intercultural dialogue and economic growth
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. : culture and the creative industries for local economic development and urban regeneration cultural heritage as a driver for economic growth and social inclusion and culture for social inclusion social innovation and intercultural dialogue see also pratt
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. heritage has a role in promoting tourism and attracting tourism to cities
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. culture and creativity can play a role in addressing city issues of public interest
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. they include: use of heritage and memory to build self-awareness self-worth and social cohesion to foster and establish social values to combat xenophobia racism gender discrimination and extreme nationalism; empowerment of people through artist and design-led education living labs and cocreation methodologies; capacity building to enable quality local cultural expression audience development and participation; intercultural dialogues and positive proactive approaches to managing cultural integration; the fight against social inequality in urban and rural contexts by stimulating cultural entrepreneurship and better management of local cultural resources to maximise participation and ownership from citizens kea et al
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. creative cities have the public and private infrastructures and institutions that create a vibrant local environment and trigger the production development and implementation of new ideas
View Maini, L., Measuring creativity. Proposal for an index to measure the creativity of cities. in order to increase the competitiveness of their cities and induce people to move there local policy makers should start raising public awareness about the importance of creative industries and the impact that creative clusters can have on the quality of life of citizens
View Jancovich, L., ; Bianchini, F., Problematising participation the partnership nature of the projects also provides an opportunity for the cultural sector to not only improve access to the arts in areas characterised by high levels of social economic and cultural exclusion but also to contribute to broader policy agendas in relation to increasing civic engagement social diversity and improving health and well-being
View Bianchini, F., ; Tommarchi, E., ; Hansen, L., E. Problematising the question of participation in Capitals of Culture participation is increasingly a common feature in both capital and city of culture coc programmes such as european capitals of culture ecoc and uk cities of culture ukcoc
View Bianchini, F., ; Tommarchi, E., ; Hansen, L., E. Problematising the question of participation in Capitals of Culture based on this broader approach the positive impacts of cultural participation on residents perception of their city impacts a b as well as on individual wellbeing self-esteem local pride and willingness to engage has been documented culture place and policy institute
View Bianchini, F., ; Tommarchi, E., ; Hansen, L., E. Problematising the question of participation in Capitals of Culture for example turku emphasised the link between culture and wellbeing also through the use of formulas and slogans such as culture does good and culture prescription in the communication of the event rampton et al
View Bianchini, F., ; Tommarchi, E., ; Hansen, L., E. Problematising the question of participation in Capitals of Culture the social impact goals of aarhus involved the activation of citizens through volunteering and as audiences as well as of young citizens who had seldom engaged in cultural projects aarhus foundation
View Bianchini, F., ; Tommarchi, E., ; Hansen, L., E. Problematising the question of participation in Capitals of Culture participation through volunteering appears nonetheless a restricted or privileged form of participation
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact participants improve their ability to form better and stronger relationships and therefore feel less lonely and experience a sense of belonging to the community
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact outcome they enhanced their knowledge and skills
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact lifelong learners report developing new skills and improving existing ones which boosts their condence and increases an appetite for more
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact this provided us with overall participants take part in sessions with visiting artists and tutors
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact participants take part in sessions with people they have never met before in a supportive environment
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact participants strengthen their social networks and improve their ability to form better and stronger relationships
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact participants have enhanced knowledge and skills and feel more connected to culture
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact participants feel empowered which increases their self- belief and leads them to be more pro-active members of the community
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact they experience a stronger sense of belonging to the community
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact participants become more competent and accomplished which makes more education and professional opportunities available to them
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact of net social value is created for participants in lifelong learning activities
View Jackson, A., ; McManus, R., SROI in the art gallery; valuing social impact it also gives them deeper insight into the personal experiences and outcomes of individual users
View Moody, E., ; Phinney, A., A community-engaged art program for older people: fostering social inclusion. Social inclusion is an important factor in promoting optimum health and wellness for older adults
View Moody, E., ; Phinney, A., A community-engaged art program for older people: fostering social inclusion. Participants also developed a stronger sense of community through collaboration as a group , working together on the arts project towards a fi nal demonstration to the larger community
View Moody, E., ; Phinney, A., A community-engaged art program for older people: fostering social inclusion. it is a factor that has been pervasive in theories of healthy aging eg kahana & kahana ; rowe & kahn and there is strong empir- ical evidence to support the claim that social inclusion plays a significant role in the health of older adults eg statistics canada
View Moody, E., ; Phinney, A., A community-engaged art program for older people: fostering social inclusion. through the ahs program the participants had the opportunity to build new connections with others in the broader community
View Moody, E., ; Phinney, A., A community-engaged art program for older people: fostering social inclusion. the ahs provided an opportunity for the seniors to build relationships across generations making new connections with young people in their neighbourhood and enriching and strengthening their connections with younger family members as well
View Moody, E., ; Phinney, A., A community-engaged art program for older people: fostering social inclusion. taken together these three interrelated processes expanding community connections developing a meaningful role through art and working together towards shared goals demonstrate how community- engaged arts can play a distinctive role in supporting social inclusion for community-dwelling seniors
View Merli, P., Evaluating the social impact of participation in arts activities. A critical review of François Matarasso’s “Use or Ornament?” for example: participation in the arts can give people influence over how they are seen by others or can help validate the contribution of a whole community or can help people extend control over their own lives or can help community groups raise their vision beyond the immediate
View Merli, P., Evaluating the social impact of participation in arts activities. A critical review of François Matarasso’s “Use or Ornament?” this is quite evident in some of his hypotheses such as: participation in the arts can promote tolerance and contribute to conflict resolution or can provide a route to rehabilitation and integration for offenders or can help people feel a sense of belonging and involvement or can be an effective means of health education or can extend involvement in social activity
View Merli, P., Evaluating the social impact of participation in arts activities. A critical review of François Matarasso’s “Use or Ornament?” this is clear in some of matarassos hypotheses such as: participation in the arts can provide a forum to explore personal rights and responsibilities whereas the welfare stateaccording to its criticshad accustomed people to focus on rights only or can encourage people to accept risk positively while the welfare state had tended to minimise risks for people
View Merli, P., Evaluating the social impact of participation in arts activities. A critical review of François Matarasso’s “Use or Ornament?” does the cultural background of participants influence the social impact of the activities
View Navarro Yanez, C., J. Do ‘creative cities’ have a dark side? Cultural scenes and socioeconomic status in Barcelona and Madrid (1991–2001) Studies of culture and creativity have shown that they can play an effective role in promoting local development
View Navarro Yanez, C., J. Do ‘creative cities’ have a dark side? Cultural scenes and socioeconomic status in Barcelona and Madrid (1991–2001) studies of culture and creativity have shown that they can play an effective role in promoting local devel- opment
View Navarro Yanez, C., J. Do ‘creative cities’ have a dark side? Cultural scenes and socioeconomic status in Barcelona and Madrid (1991–2001) cities initiate processes of urban renewal in their central and older areas to attract tourists
View Rahbarianyazd, R., ; Doratli, N., Assessing the contribution of cultural agglomeration in urban regeneration through developing cultural strategies. this concept is known as street-level culture which gives people a chance to experience the creators along with their creations florida and aims to create a more dynamic street life montgomery
View Felton E., Vichie K., Moore E. Widening participation creatively: creative arts education for social inclusion Student involvement in WP provides them with the benefit of professional learning and helps to meet the universitys targets for graduate attributes of professional learning
View Felton E., Vichie K., Moore E. Widening participation creatively: creative arts education for social inclusion Creative arts education engages not only with cognitive and skills-based learning but also with students emotional lives which provides students with strategies for exploring and expressing emotions emphasis on time for reflection and constructive feedback
View Felton E., Vichie K., Moore E. Widening participation creatively: creative arts education for social inclusion Research also shows that creative education provides opportunities for less-motivated students to achieve academically in an enjoyable learning experience as it centralizes strengths and intelligences other curriculum areas undervalue
View Felton E., Vichie K., Moore E. Widening participation creatively: creative arts education for social inclusion Students have the opportunity to further develop digital literacy skills that help to equip them with the knowledge required to communicate with digital tools and express themselves creatively
View Felton E., Vichie K., Moore E. Widening participation creatively: creative arts education for social inclusion Teams working collaboratively can harbour substantial talents and creativity and their combined efforts can produce significant results
View Felton E., Vichie K., Moore E. Widening participation creatively: creative arts education for social inclusion Creative and arts-based education in particular that has the ability to build positive personal relationships adults can represent and model pro-social values and offer respect to the young person
View Felton E., Vichie K., Moore E. Widening participation creatively: creative arts education for social inclusion The advertising program provides students with an engaging and creative activity which is also embedded in the National Curriculum
View Vrtana D., Krizanova A., Skorvagova E., Valaskova K. Exploring the affective level in adolescents in relation to advertising with a selected emotional appeal Their annual advertising campaigns also play a significant role in their success
View Vrtana D., Krizanova A., Skorvagova E., Valaskova K. Exploring the affective level in adolescents in relation to advertising with a selected emotional appeal The research findings can also contribute to the development of integrated marketing communication
View Tatlow-Golden M., Parker D. The devil is in the detail: Challenging the UK department of health’s 2019 impact assessment of the extent of online marketing of unhealthy foods to children Influencer marketing a growing strategy employs influential people in social media channels to promote brands products or services
View Tatlow-Golden M., Parker D. The devil is in the detail: Challenging the UK department of health’s 2019 impact assessment of the extent of online marketing of unhealthy foods to children Influencers are particularly eective with children and young people: ads with a celebrity presence resulted in a % greater impact on brand awareness compared to those without and Gen Z are significantly more receptive than others to content featuring celebrities and social media celebrities []
View Tatlow-Golden M., Parker D. The devil is in the detail: Challenging the UK department of health’s 2019 impact assessment of the extent of online marketing of unhealthy foods to children Indeed industry data suggest that native advertising generates positive reactions compared to more overt forms of display advertising resulting in a % increase in advertising viewed on mobile devices and a greater subconscious reaction []
View Dunkeld C., Wright M.L., Banerjee R.A., Easterbrook M.J., Slade L. Television exposure, consumer culture values, and lower well-being among preadolescent children: The mediating role of consumer-focused coping strategies Similar patterns can be found with respect to media exposure and orientation to physical appearance: An extensive body of correlational and experimental work suggests that exposure to media is associated with greater internalization of thin-body ideals in women and children and internalization of lean- and muscular-body ideals in men and boys too
View Dunkeld C., Wright M.L., Banerjee R.A., Easterbrook M.J., Slade L. Television exposure, consumer culture values, and lower well-being among preadolescent children: The mediating role of consumer-focused coping strategies We argue that greater exposure to media particularly commercial media rich in advertising may encourage individuals to turn to materialistic and appearance-related pursuits as a strategy to reduce distress and thereby increasingly begin to internalize CCIs as core life values
View Dunkeld C., Wright M.L., Banerjee R.A., Easterbrook M.J., Slade L. Television exposure, consumer culture values, and lower well-being among preadolescent children: The mediating role of consumer-focused coping strategies STUDY I The primary focus of our initial study was to investigate the role of CFC strategies as a potential mediator of the link between media exposure and indicators of emotional wellbeing
View Dunkeld C., Wright M.L., Banerjee R.A., Easterbrook M.J., Slade L. Television exposure, consumer culture values, and lower well-being among preadolescent children: The mediating role of consumer-focused coping strategies The present findings offer important first corroboration of our hypothesis that media exposure is connected with lower well-being in youth samples via a tendency to regulate negative emotions through engaging with consumer culture
View Dunkeld C., Wright M.L., Banerjee R.A., Easterbrook M.J., Slade L. Television exposure, consumer culture values, and lower well-being among preadolescent children: The mediating role of consumer-focused coping strategies The role of consumer-focused coping in media effects Previous research has suggested that exposure to media serves as a key social-contextual reinforcer of CCIs as materialistic and appearance-related attributes are prominently associated in advertising with joy happiness and positive life outcomes
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? Practical and Ethical Considerations of Implying Brand Innovation on Social Media As we see in the above vignette advertising via social media allows patients to develop a personal connection to a practice before they enter the physicians office
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? Many patients take advantage of this source of information; indeed one study found that percent of people seeking to inform themselves about plastic surgery abroad relied on the internet as their main source of information and also cited the quality of the surgeons website as the most powerful influence on their choice of plastic surgeon []
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? Although an online relationship can help foster rapport by building a sense of familiarity or even trust before an in-person meeting as we see above it can also disrupt the normal cautious consumer behavior and decision making of prospective patients
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? Besides unfairly anchoring patient expectations in the idealized image of a global celebrity the message that patients appearance is damaged and can only be repaired by experts using highly specialized techniques means that patients who internalize that message start to evaluate the work of those experts from a disempowered position
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? In the context of social media such a notion can deepen our understanding of why it is problematic that prospective patients are subjected to plastic surgeons social media advertising premised on fixing damaged identities [] as expressed in their appearance
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? The AMA Code of Medical Ethics stipulates that testimonials of patients as to a physicians skill or the quality of his or her professional services should reflect the results that patients with conditions comparable to the testimoniants condition generally receive []
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? Such practices create the conditions under which patients are more likely to be exposed to harm without their knowledge of this increased risk and are antecedent to institutional betrayal
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? In contrast to relying on their interactions with physicians for relevant cues prospective patients look to online reviews to infer the trustworthiness of physicians and these selectively presented reviews tend to skew positive for plastic surgeons and increase patient perceptions of their competence []
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? Prospective patients who are like J distressed due to dissatisfaction with their bodies and seeking help from a place of vulnerability might develop a sense of trust in a physician or medical practice based on a false intimacy that can occur on social media []
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? Patients might look to signals of competency such as describing oneself as a cosmetic surgeon providing sanguine testimonials from previous patients associating ones work with a celebrity promoting exclusive practices using scientific language or images to communicate the precision or effectiveness of a procedure curating a sizable online following or demonstrating a particular charm or charisma in online postings
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? This trust combined with signals about the scientific rigor of innovative treatments and access to videos or other materials that show portions of a procedure or before-and-after pictures might lead prospective patients to undertake a procedure with inflated expectations setting up both patient and physician for the difficult task of managing disappointment
View Smith C.P., George D. When is advertising a plastic surgeon’s individual “brand” unethical? Physicians productively engaging with patients on social media can be a powerful way of transparently demonstrating how a practice does medicine and what reasonable expectations might be associated with particular clinical treatments
View Slater A., Bowen J., Corsini N., Gardner C., Golley R., Noakes M. Understanding parent concerns about childrens diet, activity and weight status: An important step towards effective obesity prevention interventions Understanding environmental influencers of childrens eating and activity patterns is important in developing effective obesity prevention and management interventions
View Slater A., Bowen J., Corsini N., Gardner C., Golley R., Noakes M. Understanding parent concerns about childrens diet, activity and weight status: An important step towards effective obesity prevention interventions In Australia studies have investigated parents perceptions about childhood overweight and obesity and perceived barriers to healthy eating in preschoolers parental perception of influences on food choices of --year-olds and attitudes to physical activity in pre-schoolers
View Slater A., Bowen J., Corsini N., Gardner C., Golley R., Noakes M. Understanding parent concerns about childrens diet, activity and weight status: An important step towards effective obesity prevention interventions These findings are consistent with findings with Australian parents of --year-olds and --year-olds as well as UK parents of --year-olds that support the conclusion that while parents acknowledge their role or responsibilities around providing children with healthy food support is needed to overcome barriers such as child/family resistance to a healthy diet use of treats and lack of time/busy lifestyle
View Pollay R.W. Targeting youth and concerned smokers: Evidence from Canadian tobacco industry documents Personal health was measured for diseases of concern symptoms experienced serious medical problems and personal tness with starters experiencing above average amounts of dry mouth shortness of breath excess phlegm chest pains and serious breathing or respiratory problems
View Pollay R.W. Targeting youth and concerned smokers: Evidence from Canadian tobacco industry documents It has provided considerable psychological insight into starters and smokers such as their motivations perceptions attitudes interests and responses to test advertising
View Robazza P., Longo D., Bortoli G., Alese G., Boeri A. DIY urbanism as a tool of urban regeneration. Two cases in comparison Citizens designers and institutions implemented a path of mutual knowledge learning the implied dynamics in the new participation tools
View Robazza P., Longo D., Bortoli G., Alese G., Boeri A. DIY urbanism as a tool of urban regeneration. Two cases in comparison This experience shows that this increased awareness of the community and the attention to maintenance in perspective constitutes an important factor of urban quality
View Filippi F.D., Cocina G.G., Martinuzzi C. Integrating different data sources to address urban security in informal areas. The case study of Kibera, Nairobi The findings show that urban planning and design strongly impact crime occurrence
View Stupar A., Mihajlov V., Lalovic K., Colic R., Petrovic F. Participative placemaking in Serbia: The use of the limitless GIS application in increasing the sustainability of universal urban design It enables the identification of design elements important for improving pedestrian safety and walkability
View Horgan D., Dimitrijević B. Frameworks for citizens participation in planning: From conversational to smart tools that simultaneously meet a social need and lead to new or improved capabilities and relationships and better use of assets and resources
View Horgan D., Dimitrijević B. Frameworks for citizens participation in planning: From conversational to smart tools In an empirical investigation of social innovation initiatives for sustainable urban development Angelidou and Psaltoglou found the link between social innovation and sustainable development to be very pronounced owing to the challenges that contemporary urban settlements face and their position as places where urban futures and the knowledge and innovation economy come together
View Horgan D., Dimitrijević B. Frameworks for citizens participation in planning: From conversational to smart tools As criticism of the smart city and of neoliberal approaches to social innovation more generally gain traction it is important that research closely examines the role of the government in facilitating participation in planning
View Horgan D., Dimitrijević B. Frameworks for citizens participation in planning: From conversational to smart tools The Place Standard a tool which was developed with planners and architects in Scotland lets communities public agencies voluntary groups and others find those aspects of a place that need to be targeted to improve peoples health wellbeing and quality of life; provides a simple framework to structure conversations about place and takes a long-term view of sustainability encompassing a number of domains -including local economy public transport and housing - allowing distinct and separate organisations to work together productively
View Horgan D., Dimitrijević B. Frameworks for citizens participation in planning: From conversational to smart tools A city that proposes an overarching policy based around wellbeing also encourages the development solutions that give advantage to wider innovation in healthcare or technology often bringing in solutions from other sectors that have never been applied to the built environment
View Horgan D., Dimitrijević B. Frameworks for citizens participation in planning: From conversational to smart tools Cities have increasingly looked to the Smart City as a set of technologies that can support growth based on delivering greater efficiencies and better user experience for citizens among decreasing resources
View Serrano-Jiménez A., Lima M.L., Molina-Huelva M., Barrios-Padura Á. Promoting urban regeneration and aging in place: APRAM – An interdisciplinary method to support decision-making in building renovation This demographic process is associated with a higher environmental impact in residential built-up environments since this elderly population sector increases energy consumption due to its tendency to spend more time at home and to suffer from a higher sensitivity to temperature and comfort conditions
View Lee B., Na I.S. A case study of a community center project based on appropriate technology as a community capacity building of underdeveloped country Draw peoples cooperative work and contribute to the development of the local community
View Trevino Sherk J., Cobreros Rodriguez C. Rural democratic design: Participatory design and service learning strategies in sustainable development to promote civic mindedness in community development Their framework states the core domains of civic learning are civic knowledge civic associations and civic action
View Trevino Sherk J., Cobreros Rodriguez C. Rural democratic design: Participatory design and service learning strategies in sustainable development to promote civic mindedness in community development It also states that the key qualities of learning as information rich critical and strategic participatory culturally responsive and reflective []
View Haklay M., Jankowski P., Zwoliński Z. Selected modern methods and tools for public participation in urban planning - A review A review of public participation in urban planning shows new developments in concepts and methods rooted in geography, landscape architecture, psychology, and sociology, accompanied by progress in geoinformation and communication technologies
View Haklay M., Jankowski P., Zwoliński Z. Selected modern methods and tools for public participation in urban planning - A review This approach allows to overlay an urban structure with behavioural and experiential factors and then link them with health and wellbeing indicators to create explanatory models
View Haklay M., Jankowski P., Zwoliński Z. Selected modern methods and tools for public participation in urban planning - A review Cities can be seen as complex interacting systems of urban artefacts and spatially situated social practices
View Haklay M., Jankowski P., Zwoliński Z. Selected modern methods and tools for public participation in urban planning - A review To start making resilience improvements cities need to build a capacity for change
View Haklay M., Jankowski P., Zwoliński Z. Selected modern methods and tools for public participation in urban planning - A review Dzigcielski posited that ERP originally conceived for big companies can be adopted to give public participation a role in finding solutions that lead to improving the quality of life
View Haklay M., Jankowski P., Zwoliński Z. Selected modern methods and tools for public participation in urban planning - A review Emplacement creates certain association and understanding
View Nguyen T.H.N. Design for design - Design by community Taking ownership of people the active participation of people is the key of the project
View Nguyen T.H.N. Design for design - Design by community Active empowerment has helped to reduce construction costs and increase community cohesion
View Nguyen T.H.N. Design for design - Design by community Local government is a very important factor in supporting and facilitating the success of the project: An open minded government able to adopt new ways of doing things empowering people to set up and implement the plan will be an important factor for the project to be effective
View Makhzoumi J., Al-Sabbagh S. Landscape and urban governance: Participatory planning of the public realm in Saida, Lebanon MedCities participatory bottom-up methodological approach was a key to reinforce the role competences and resources of local administrations in the adoption and implementation of sustainable local development policies and equally to develop citizens awareness and involvement in the sustainable development of their towns and cities []
View Makhzoumi J., Al-Sabbagh S. Landscape and urban governance: Participatory planning of the public realm in Saida, Lebanon The landscape vision integrates rivers the seafront and other components identified as forming a Green-Blue Network that protects them as landscape heritage environmental resource ecological corridors and amenity spaces
View Kochergina E. Urban Planning Aspects of Museum Quarters as an Architectural Medium for Creative Cities One of the most intensively growing field-creative industry-provided cities with numerous cultural clusters, which boosted urban economic development and social cohesion
View Kochergina E. Urban Planning Aspects of Museum Quarters as an Architectural Medium for Creative Cities It hosts big scale public movements experiences seasonal changes political regimes social unrest and urban transformations related to them
View Valladares A. Successes and failures of participation-in-design: Cases from Old Havana, Cuba They also stressed their incapability to foster the development of a sense of community among residents
View Valladares A. Successes and failures of participation-in-design: Cases from Old Havana, Cuba Studies attempting to establish a critical view of participatory design approaches have identified some obstacles to their success such as the difficulty in maintaining trust between program beneficiaries and granting agencies reluctance on the part of governmental bodies to give power to low-income residents and frequent reduction in the participation of residents to the provision of labor in the form of sweat equity
View Valladares A. Successes and failures of participation-in-design: Cases from Old Havana, Cuba conclude that the strengthening of community ties facilitates the implementation of development projects
View Widodo J., Wong Y.C., Ismail F. DIGITAL HISTORIC URBAN LANDSCAPE METHODOLOGY for HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT of SINGAPORE Through this research, we hope to uncover for better experience of digital heritage architecture where interpretation is an evolving process' that is participatory and contributory that allows public participation, together with effective presentation, cultural learning and embodiment, to enhance the end-users' interpretation of digital heritage architecture
View Widodo J., Wong Y.C., Ismail F. DIGITAL HISTORIC URBAN LANDSCAPE METHODOLOGY for HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT of SINGAPORE The workshop done over the summer vacation helps to increase appreciation of urban development and heritage
View Widodo J., Wong Y.C., Ismail F. DIGITAL HISTORIC URBAN LANDSCAPE METHODOLOGY for HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT of SINGAPORE The implementation of such a model serves to create greater public awareness among the people of some significant heritage architecture around the city and encourage experts to think of efforts to treat the environment which is historically significant to the public
View Widodo J., Wong Y.C., Ismail F. DIGITAL HISTORIC URBAN LANDSCAPE METHODOLOGY for HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT of SINGAPORE Cultural Learning Encourage audience to discover relationships and context of sites or buildings network Encourage audience to contribute meanings and values through sites or buildings Provoke audience to reveal symbolic meanings of sites or buildings The website should act as the archive for the heritage architecture on a digital platform where it will enable greater cultural learning
View Widodo J., Wong Y.C., Ismail F. DIGITAL HISTORIC URBAN LANDSCAPE METHODOLOGY for HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT of SINGAPORE Additionally in taking advantage of the significant amount of data on Singapores tangible architectural and cultural heritage that can be found in existing government databases an architectural heritage layer on the proposed digital platform that serves as an anchor for other sources that pertain to architecture and cultural heritage of a particular building or site as well as public and professional contributions
View Widodo J., Wong Y.C., Ismail F. DIGITAL HISTORIC URBAN LANDSCAPE METHODOLOGY for HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT of SINGAPORE This consolidation could also facilitate and maximise the shared economies model of knowledge skills and resources
View Widodo J., Wong Y.C., Ismail F. DIGITAL HISTORIC URBAN LANDSCAPE METHODOLOGY for HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT of SINGAPORE It will give them a good sense of heritage and to be invested in their heritage
View Widodo J., Wong Y.C., Ismail F. DIGITAL HISTORIC URBAN LANDSCAPE METHODOLOGY for HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT of SINGAPORE Thus they could get involved with the activities and increase the interaction with the heritage architecture to foster a greater learning experience
View Kosk K. Social Participation in Residential Architecture as an Instrument for Transforming Both the Architecture and the People Who Participate in It The author hypothesizes that social participation in the design of residential architecture has a positive impact both on the architecture and on the relations between people who are involved in the creation of such an architecture
View Kosk K. Social Participation in Residential Architecture as an Instrument for Transforming Both the Architecture and the People Who Participate in It The author hypothesizes that social participation in the design of residential architecture has a positive impact both on the architecture and on the relations between people who are involved in the creation of such an architecture
View Kosk K. Social Participation in Residential Architecture as an Instrument for Transforming Both the Architecture and the People Who Participate in It Gehl [] resulted in the identification of nine characteristics of space that affect human attachment to place and that foster social integration and the feeling of identity with a place of residence thus affecting the development of community-based neighbourly bonds
View Kosk K. Social Participation in Residential Architecture as an Instrument for Transforming Both the Architecture and the People Who Participate in It Various types of buildings located among residential buildings provide an additional opportunity for social interaction between neighbours
View Urbanowicz K., Nyka L. Interactive and Media Architecture - From Social Encounters to City Planning Strategies Numerous examples of permanent projects temporary interventions and prototype studies in the public spaces have shown that new media art in form of urban screens [ ] interactive surfaces and installations [] and responsive interventions engaging active participation [] can stimulate various types of interactions [] between people and the art form as well as different social relations and Shared Encounters [ ]
View Jones P. Situating universal design architecture: Designing with whom? Implications for RehabilitationUniversal Design architecture shares a close affinity with rehabilitation practice, with the creation of built environments that allow use by individuals with a wide range of capacities a priority for both
View Jones P. Situating universal design architecture: Designing with whom? Architecturally disabling [] outcomes continue to be prevalent in cities the world over and understanding the built environment through the lens ofa social model of disability suggests profit in examining architecture as one way of developing spaces that facilitate peoples social functioning
View Park J., Lee H., Yim S. A case of preservation of the modern and regeneration of old downtown through civic participatory remodeling procedure: Experimentation in Gwangju, Korea This project also increased participation of the citizens as it also includes work pieces of young domestic artists and projects by famous international artists
View Afacan Y., Afacan S.O. Rethinking social inclusivity: Design strategies for cities This study approaches social inclusivity within the context of universal urban design and defines it as a vehicle for promoting human wellbeing, environmental wholeness and principles of participatory democracy
View Afacan Y., Afacan S.O. Rethinking social inclusivity: Design strategies for cities Size and space for approach and use The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities rather than segregating or stigmatising any users The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities Use of the design is easy to understand regardless of the users experience knowledge language skills or current concentration level The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user regardless of ambient conditions or the users sensory abilities The design minimises hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions The design can be used efficiently and comfortably and with a minimum of fatigue Appropriate size and space is provided for approach reach manipulation and use regardless of the users body size posture or mobility Table
View Afacan Y., Afacan S.O. Rethinking social inclusivity: Design strategies for cities This study thus approaches social inclusivity within the context of universal urban design and defines it as a vehicle for promoting human wellbeing environmental wholeness and the principles of participatory democracy
View Afacan Y., Afacan S.O. Rethinking social inclusivity: Design strategies for cities The hospital embodied most of the attributes associated with mat urbanism such as a one-to-two storey distributed configuration the use of a highly flexible and remanufactured construction system and allocation of functions along courtyards as well as providing equitable care to all patients and treatment of nursing facilities
View Rice L., Drane M. Indicators of Healthy Architecture—a Systematic Literature Review The indoorisation of society is a worrying trend for human health for three reasons; firstly there is evidence associating time spent outdoors with improved outcomes for health and wellbeing; and secondly time spent indoors is negatively associated with a number of health issues []
View Rice L., Drane M. Indicators of Healthy Architecture—a Systematic Literature Review In terms of physical health air pollution and/or contaminated air are the most significant risks in the short term for respiratory disease allergy and asthma symptoms []; longer term indoor lifestyles are associated with sedentary lifestyles which contribute indirectly towards other health issues such as obesity cancer diabetes which cause mortality and/or cardiovascular disease [-]
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Background People with chronic conditions have complex healthcare needs that lead to challenges for adequate healthcare provision
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study A modular perspective, in particular providing visualization of the modular service architecture, is promising for improving the responsiveness of healthcare services to the complex healthcare needs of people with chronic conditions
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study The modular service architecture provides a comprehensive representation of the components and modules of healthcare provision
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Results Our study shows that the perspectives on healthcare provision of professionals and patients differ substantially
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study In contrast, the modular service architecture based on the patients perspective, which we define as a person-centered modular service architecture, provided a representation of the healthcare service that was primarily based on functional outcomes and the overall wellbeing of the patients
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study We suggest that a person-centered modular service architecture that focuses on functional outcomes and overall wellbeing, enables increased responsiveness of healthcare services to people with complex healthcare needs and provision of truly person-centered care
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Multiplicity refers to the growing number of involved providers components and interactions in service provision [ ] and is demonstrated by the various professionals from different units or departments who deliver a high number of components for the treatment of patients with complex healthcare needs
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study First we provide the complete modular service architecture of healthcare provision for people with complex healthcare needs
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study The patients actually attached greater value to functional outcomes and overall wellbeing as opposed to medical outcomes
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Interestingly we observed a clear difference between the medical specialists and the other healthcare professionals
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Patients argued that extensive descriptions of possible healthcare provision might cause them to lose track in the jungle of all possible components
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study In doing so it focusses on the functional outcomes and overall wellbeing as opposed to the medical outcomes
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Discussion We explored the applicability of MSA visualization in chronic healthcare provision for children with DS from the perspective of patients alongside that of healthcare professionals
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Our results show that the MSA proved to be very illuminating for professionals and patients since it led to insight into the work practices of each professional which increased transparency on services offered for both professionals and patients
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Moreover we show that MSA visualization provides possibilities for mixing and matching components and modules to address individual needs and as such increases the responsiveness of healthcare services to people with complex healthcare needs
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Our study shows that the patients perspective is essential to mix-and-match components in such a way that modular healthcare packages are created that are truly responsive to the needs and requirements of people with complex healthcare needs
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study We show that the MSA built from the perspective of the patients differs substantially from the MSA built from the perspective of the healthcare professionals
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study This person-centered MSA visualization provides a complete representation of the healthcare service based on functional outcomes and overall wellbeing and shows that insight into the patients perspective is important for the delivery of person-centered care [ ]
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study It offers patients and professionals the possibility of mixing and matching person-centered modules and components to create individualized person-centered care packages without ignoring the professional role of the healthcare professionals
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study MSA can serve as a tool to increase their understanding of peoples complex healthcare needs and identify duplications and gaps in their healthcare provision
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Our person-centered MSA approach can be applied by others by following three steps: ) detailed identification of all individual healthcare parts and elements in collaboration with patients and professionals ) labelling and reshaping these parts from the patients perspective thereby focusing on functional outcomes and overall wellbeing when combining and grouping components and modules and ) selection of appropriate modules and components for person-centered healthcare provision
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study We believe that the MSA approach is also applicable for patients with more variable multi-morbidity but a similarity in their healthcare needs such as patients with cancer
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study A lack of coordination could lead to increased health risks for people with complex healthcare needs for instance when patients receive conflicting treatments or unnecessary duplications from multiple healthcare professionals
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Interfaces allow for the interaction and communication between modules components and people involved in healthcare provision []
View Peters V.J.T., Meijboom B.R., Bunt J.E.H., Bok L.A., van Steenbergen M.W., de Winter J.P., de Vries E. Providing person-centered care for patients with complex healthcare needs: A qualitative study Our reshaping of the results into a person-centered MSA visualization focusing on functional outcomes and overall wellbeing instead of medical outcomes of separate disease entities enables provision of truly person-centered care
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture Although there is a growing understanding of how much architecture influences our wellbeing, architectural thought still clings to the antibiotic turn
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture Following the tradition of exchange between architecture and medicine, we propose the notion of Probiotic Architecture as a way of framing the shifting understanding of health in architectural design, suggesting that the microorganisms that colonise humans and our built environment have the potential to influence our health and the resilience of our buildings
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture Microbiome describes communities of microbial organisms that develop in and around human bodies and assist them in digesting food and developing their immune system
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture Doctors and surgeons extended their assessments of human health to that of their patients house identifying sick buildings and following diagnosis proposing strategies to treat and heal unhealthy buildings
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture The benefit of fresh air in buildings was observed in hospitals where wards with open windows demonstrated improvements in patient health and quicker recovery from illness compared to wards with no or closed windows
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture A new wave of confidence over the threat of infection facilitated a shift in focus in building design from health and exposure to nature to that of comfort in mechanically controlled environments
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture The exhibition showed the association of philanthropists and activists to create a widespread understanding of what a healthy architecture looks like
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture Inspired by the diet of rural communities in Russia and the Balkan States Metchnikoff proposed the use of probiotics: bacteria found in yoghurt and soured milk which he believed manipulated the intestinal microbiome and countered the negative effect of phagocytes on healthy tissue
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture Recent research has suggested the existence of a gutbrain axis creating a direct link between disorders such as dysbiosis anxiety and depression and giving rise to treatment that involves the use of probiotics to restore gut microbial balance and treat mental health disorders
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture Probiotic Architecture Probiotic Architecture involves an understanding of the interaction between built environment artefacts humans and their microbial communities resulting in design strategies that actively shape the environmental microbiome to promote well-being and human health
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture The dynamism between building and microbiome suggests a rich area of opportunity and we suggest that the microorganisms that colonise humans and our built environment have the potential to influence our health and the resilience of our buildings
View Ramirez-Figueroa C., Beckett R. Living with buildings, living with microbes: Probiosis and architecture As we have suggested widespread use of antibiotics in the mid-twentieth century resulted in a wave of confidence over treatment of infections and facilitated a shift in focus away from health and exposure to nature to a mechanically controlled well-tempered environment
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Background: The physical place and environment has a profound influence on experiences, health and wellbeing of birthing women
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Conclusion: Our findings support the use of principles of healing architecture and Snoezelen in birth environments and add to the evidence on how the physical design of hospital environments influence on both social and physical aspects of the well-being of patients
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Hospital design improvements have been shown to affect neurological and physical responses and to have the potential to alter patients state of mind []
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care The physical birth environment is known to affect the production and release of neurochemicals such as oxytocin - a key mediator of social and emotional behavior [] as well as the physiology of normal birth []
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care The world over a variety of alternative maternity care settings have been designed to support normal labor and birth as well as to stimulate more positive birth experiences
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Organization models as well as care and staffing models vary greatly but their differences notwithstanding such alternative birth environments all aim to decrease birthing mothers anxiety and promote mobility and personal control []
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Establishing a physical environment to support the women and their families activities could help them toward a caring effective and safe birth experience [ ] an attribute of more patient-centered healthcare practices []
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care This qualitative study is a separate but adjunct study to the RCT and the objective was to gain deeper understandings of womens experiences of the alternative birth environment and its ability to support the concept of patient-centeredness in the care of birthing women
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care As the alternative delivery room is a part of the obstetric care unit all women in this qualitative study gave birth in the alternative delivery room despite that some of the women experienced complications eg prolonged labor post-partum bleeding influenced heartrate of child and perineal injuries during birth
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Physical comfort Positive distractions For some of the women the visual and auditory stimuli captured attention which was helpful to their coping with labor and maintaining a sense of control
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care A possible explanation for this might be that comfortable and familiar environment is known to promote feelings of safety confidence and a sense of self and to have a strengthening effect on womens physiological functioning and emotional well-being []
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Thirdly most women found that the environment helped them obtain physical comfort and encouraged active behavior which may offer psychological benefits in their coping with labor relaxation and feeling in control
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Our study thereby suggest that both the environment and midwives play an in important role in women achieving a physical comfort and a sense of control
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care What this study adds The findings have added to the evidence on the positive influence of hospital environment design on patients psychological and physical well-being and thereby the psychosocial outcomes of care
View Nielsen J.H., Overgaard C. Healing architecture and Snoezelen in delivery room design: A qualitative study of women's birth experiences and patient-centeredness of care Our findings thus support the development of patient-centered birth environments in future hospital design to promote the physical and psychological wellbeing of the woman and her partner
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology The resulting consequences are catastrophic, leading to a significant socio-economic burden, which includes significant reductions in quality of life and limitations in regular work and daily activities of patients
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology Although patients with RDs report pain and disability they give the impression to be healthy
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology Patients with RDs report reduced QoL in many areas including physical health psychological status level of independence social relationships and interaction with the environment and personal beliefs or perceptions compared to the normal population
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology A lot of studies on the value of physical and motor activities and home exercises in patients with arthritis rarely take into account the role of architectural barriers especially in small houses which reduce their consistency in performing these exercises
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology The EP studies the interaction between human beings and their environments analyzing both the environmental impact of human behaviors and the effects that natural and built environments have on emotions behaviors lifestyles and wellness
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology The interaction between the individuals and their environment: the docility hypothesis The ecological model of interaction between the individual and the environment considers the process of adaptation of the individual to his environment as deriving from the interaction between the environmental competence and the environmental pressure
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology In the presence of a vulnerable condition as in a chronic disease it can diminish competences and simultaneously increase the burden of environmental pressure
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology User-centered design culture: a virtuous approach to rheumatic diseases and role of patients associations Both in design and architectural psychology some projects have emerged in recent years aimed to improve the quality of life of patients with RDs
View Punzi L., Chia M., Cipolletta S., Dolcetti C., Galozzi P., Giovinazzi O., Tonolo S., Zava R., Pazzaglia F. The role of architectural design for rheumatic patients’ wellbeing: The point of view of environmental psychology This work is based in particular on a co-design activity between patients designers doctors and therapists necessary to redesign those objects perceived by the patient as not very functional
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization The physical environment affects people's behavior and wellbeing
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Thus, people may be unaware of the real triggers for changes in behavior, mood, and wellbeing
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Individuals grow up study develop work meet old and new friends start forming families raise their children and even die in places built by men
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization These physiological changes such as the activation of specific brain areas and changes in hormone levels and skin conductance can help further understand the effects of the environment on people
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Short-term exposure short-term effects of architecture in the brain Organisms respond to short-term environmental changes by reversibly adjusting their physiology to maximize resource utilization while maintaining structural and genetic integrity by repairing and minimizing damage to cellular infrastructure thereby balancing innovation with robustness Short-term exposure short-term effects are mostly those that happen after an interaction with the space which lasts from a few seconds to one day
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization These effects can vary from slight changes in the direction of an individuals walk ; increased or decreased working memory ; changes in muscle tension heart rate and blood pressure; to changes in emotions and mental states
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization A short-term exposure short-term effect in this case can be the fact that just by viewing a natural sight for a few minutes can help lower stress levels blood pressure and muscle tension
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Light also regulates physiological and psychological rhythms directly impacting wakefulness and sleep hormone secretion cellular function and genetic expression
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization As a result the deregulation can cause insomnia and other sleep disorders privation of mood control trends of depression loss of concentration enhanced stress levels and impaired immune system in the long term
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization They affect the way people feel consciously or unconsciously thereby triggering changes in behavior and wellbeing
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization People with damages in brain areas responsible for processing emotions have experienced changes in their personalities and behavior
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Both examples show a deep intention behind architecture and a strategic use of space to induce behavior and connection by evoking different emotions
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Moreover attentional and motivational components of emotion have been linked to heightened learning and memory
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Long-term exposure long-term effects of architecture in the brain Long-term exposure long-term effect are those that can last for a long time even when the exposure to the environment is over
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Animals living in the enriched environment presented changes in brain weight size and thickness and better results in learning
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization It is a brain structure that plays a major role in long-term memory processes and spatial navigation
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization However the World Health Organization outlines other detrimental effects of noise such as disruption of the circadian rhythms during sleep reduction of sense of control over the environment and impaired cognitive functions
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Social interaction has various effects on mental and physical health because both characteristics are contrarily linked with several diseases from colds to heart attacks depression strokes and cancer
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization By contrast architectural environments that offer cognitive social and physical stimulation can help prevent many physical illnesses and mental diseases avoid stress and enhance learning and memory processes
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Several other factors can influence how a built environment affects individuals: the time and frequency of use the way individuals interact with the environment culture and personal experience and the social environment
View de Paiva A., Jedon R. Short- and long-term effects of architecture on the brain: Toward theoretical formalization Neuroarchitecture studies can also help to improve the design of buildings and cities and improve health and wellbeing on the short and long term
View Villanueva C.M.S. Transformations of Urban Space in Community and Pedestrian Wellbeing The ultimate goal of a resilient society is the wellbeing of its community
View Villanueva C.M.S. Transformations of Urban Space in Community and Pedestrian Wellbeing Wellbeing is when individuals have the psychological, social, and physical resources they need to meet a particular psychological, social, and/or physical challenge
View Villanueva C.M.S. Transformations of Urban Space in Community and Pedestrian Wellbeing When individuals have more challenges than resources, the see-saw dips, along with their wellbeing, and vice-versa
View Villanueva C.M.S. Transformations of Urban Space in Community and Pedestrian Wellbeing Findings show that the manifestations of transformations in urban space occur in fluid trajectories that can be in patterns of horizontal, vertical, and cyclical schemes in achieving community and pedestrian wellbeing
View Villanueva C.M.S. Transformations of Urban Space in Community and Pedestrian Wellbeing Grassroots effort with initiatives harnessed by the social and intellectual capital of multi-sectoral stakeholders and community planners may manifest in cyclical or non-material factors such as social supports freedom and fairness which play a bigger role than money in future wellbeing
View Villanueva C.M.S. Transformations of Urban Space in Community and Pedestrian Wellbeing Cyclical transformations transcend soft and hard infrastructure and focus more on the resiliency of community and pedestrian wellbeing
View Villanueva C.M.S. Transformations of Urban Space in Community and Pedestrian Wellbeing The vulnerabilities that people encounter in urban space can be mitigated with continued engagement of community movements the use of mass media and academic discourses with the youth sector to voice the vision of comprehensive cyclical transformations in pedestrian and community wellbeing
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design Social scientists have emphasised the coercive elements of psychiatry and mental healthcare which result in vulnerable individuals including those with severe and enduring mental illnesses being held in custody rather than recipients of quality care-orientated community-based mental healthcare
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design In England % of imprisoned women have been diagnosed with depression compared to % of incarcerated men and women account for almost a quarter of all prison self-harm incidents even though they make up just % of the overall prison population []
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design On prison governors social media sites and in their public presentations before and after photographs of prison cells association rooms classrooms and exercise yards are produced as evidence of an enlightened approach
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design In short our aim is to take the sociology of health and illness into new territory arguing that a women-centred trauma-informed approach to health and emotional wellbeing in prisons must start with the processes of prison commissioning planning and design
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design Therefore while stang levels security factors education and employment opportunities are important determinants of a facilitys culture and climate and high-quality healthcare and psychology provision are crucial for prisoners chances of recovery from short- and long-term health problems equally significant to the shaping of a healthy or unhealthy carceral experience are a buildings age architecture location interior design and exterior landscaping
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design Consequently many women in custody are held in facilities designed for men young oenders or for some altogether dierent purpose than imprisonment with the result that the architecture and environment may inhibit their recovery and rehabilitation and aggravate feelings of depression and/or anxiety
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design A growing awareness of the need for TICP-led service delivery has developed amid concerns regarding the complexities associated with treating women with dual diagnoses of addiction and mental health disorders and who also frequently disclose co-occurring and co-morbid experiences of interpersonal traumaspecifically physical and sexual violence and abuseacross the lifecourse []
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design As mentioned previously the eects of the built environment are not easy to extrapolate from other intersecting factors that might impinge on an individuals mental health and wellbeing but prison receptions are usually profoundly de-personalising in layout and design as well as in the manner in which they invasively process people
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design A stand-alone family help hub near the main entrance of the prison oered a welcoming and supportive environment for visitors and provided them with access to social services charities and third-sector organisations who could assist prisoners and their familiesvery much like Maggies Centres do for cancer patients and their families
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design It goes without saying that provision of care for women at risk of substance abuse self-harm and suicide is core to trauma-informed practice but one element of design that has a broad evidence base to support its health-giving properties is access to and interaction with nature
View Jewkes Y., Jordan M., Wright S., Bendelow G. Designing ‘healthy’ prisons for women: Incorporating trauma-informed care and practice (TICP) into prison planning and design Studies of hospital patients have linked even views of nature to faster recovery times reduced demand for medication and lower levels of frustration and impatience while studies of prisons have found that landscapes that incorporate trees and the wildlife they attract reduce feelings of sterility in the carceral environment and lead to general improvements in emotional wellbeing
View Friesinger J.G., Topor A., Bøe T.D., Larsen I.B. Studies regarding supported housing and the built environment for people with mental health problems: A mixed-methods literature review Rog and colleagues reviewed quantitative studies and other systematic reviews of housing and concluded a moderate level of evidence regarding reduced homelessness hospitalisation increased tenure compared to other housing models or treatment as usual or no housing
View Friesinger J.G., Topor A., Bøe T.D., Larsen I.B. Studies regarding supported housing and the built environment for people with mental health problems: A mixed-methods literature review A review of qualitative studies on service user experiences of supported accommodation stressed the interplay of various factors that formed the tenants' lived experiences and affected recovery and identity
View Friesinger J.G., Topor A., Bøe T.D., Larsen I.B. Studies regarding supported housing and the built environment for people with mental health problems: A mixed-methods literature review In a comprehensive review of articles on the effects of the architectural design of mental health facilities such as mental hospitals the authors concluded that the design of security lighting the therapeutic milieu gardens rooms for patients and interiors had benefits for the well-being of the patients and staff and the duration of stay
View Capolongo S., Rebecchi A., Dettori M., Appolloni L., Azara A., Buffoli M., Capasso L., Casuccio A., Conti G.O., D’amico A., Ferrante M., Moscato U., Oberti I., Paglione L., Restivo V., D’alessandro D. Healthy design and urban planning strategies, actions, and policy to achieve salutogenic cities Design strategies, actions, and policies, identified to improve public health and wellbeing, underline that the connection between morphological and functional features of urban context and public health is crucial for contemporary cities and modern societies
View Capolongo S., Rebecchi A., Dettori M., Appolloni L., Azara A., Buffoli M., Capasso L., Casuccio A., Conti G.O., D’amico A., Ferrante M., Moscato U., Oberti I., Paglione L., Restivo V., D’alessandro D. Healthy design and urban planning strategies, actions, and policy to achieve salutogenic cities Design strategies actions and policies identified to improve public health and wellbeing underline that the connection between morphological and functional features of urban context and public health is crucial for contemporary cities and modern societies
View Capolongo S., Rebecchi A., Dettori M., Appolloni L., Azara A., Buffoli M., Capasso L., Casuccio A., Conti G.O., D’amico A., Ferrante M., Moscato U., Oberti I., Paglione L., Restivo V., D’alessandro D. Healthy design and urban planning strategies, actions, and policy to achieve salutogenic cities Domestic accidents indoor air quality water supply management and collection of municipal solid waste and green and blue areas represent features of the built environment that could directly and indirectly impact on citizens health without neglecting the key role of the living environments in protecting living conditions against climate changes []
View Capolongo S., Rebecchi A., Dettori M., Appolloni L., Azara A., Buffoli M., Capasso L., Casuccio A., Conti G.O., D’amico A., Ferrante M., Moscato U., Oberti I., Paglione L., Restivo V., D’alessandro D. Healthy design and urban planning strategies, actions, and policy to achieve salutogenic cities For example the urban heat island effect and urban pollution are two major interconnected problems of the urban environment that have become more serious with rapid urbanization and both the removal and loss of urban green spaces [] and affect human health causing an increase in cases of cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality
View Capolongo S., Rebecchi A., Dettori M., Appolloni L., Azara A., Buffoli M., Capasso L., Casuccio A., Conti G.O., D’amico A., Ferrante M., Moscato U., Oberti I., Paglione L., Restivo V., D’alessandro D. Healthy design and urban planning strategies, actions, and policy to achieve salutogenic cities Background Taking all of this into account this research work proposed by the working group Building and Environmental Hygiene of the Italian Society of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine represents an update of the most important risk factors and related Healthy Urban Planning actions strategies and policies for the improvement of public health and wellbeing in contemporary cities
View Capolongo S., Rebecchi A., Dettori M., Appolloni L., Azara A., Buffoli M., Capasso L., Casuccio A., Conti G.O., D’amico A., Ferrante M., Moscato U., Oberti I., Paglione L., Restivo V., D’alessandro D. Healthy design and urban planning strategies, actions, and policy to achieve salutogenic cities The findings of a recent Canadian study [] highlight that a concerted effort of Public Health managers together with electrical and fuel providers in response to floods dust storms and hurricanes can reduce some vulnerabilities that could impact access to food especially for urban populations
View Capolongo S., Rebecchi A., Dettori M., Appolloni L., Azara A., Buffoli M., Capasso L., Casuccio A., Conti G.O., D’amico A., Ferrante M., Moscato U., Oberti I., Paglione L., Restivo V., D’alessandro D. Healthy design and urban planning strategies, actions, and policy to achieve salutogenic cities Practical feasible repeatable strategies and actions that could be adopted are listed below: ^ to conduct environmental audits of public spaces that are commonly identified as unsafe followed by community generated programs to improve the appearance of neighborhoods []; ^ to design neighborhood strategies to enhance community cohesion; ^ to promote community justice initiatives to improve responsibility for behavior in offenders and enhance victim satisfaction with the justice system; ^ to discourage behavior that triggers fear utilizing alcohol-free zones and other strategies; ^ to take into consideration strategies that encourage women to report violence and harassment and to access support services; ^ to increase public awareness of any reduction in crime rates or in risk factors associated with fear of crime; ^ to increase the role of police as purveyors of reassurance toward the messages of fear of politics and the media; ^ to design lots streets and houses to encourage interaction between neighbors
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes The built environment influences the wellbeing of older people in care homes
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Findings provide insight into the qualities of the built environment that have impact on the activity and potential wellbeing of older residents
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes INTRODUCTION The built environment does affect wellbeing Previous studies have evidenced the effect of the built environment on the wellbeing and quality of life of care home residents
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Many correlations between particular built environment features and the effects on wellbeing have been uncovered
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Wellbeing improvement understood through promoting certain types of everyday activity Whilst the definition of wellbeing is problematic the New Economics Foundation and UK Government Office of Sciences Foresight Programme offer a way in which the contribution of everyday personal activities to wellbeing can be considered
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes The five ways to wellbeing is framed as a call to action highlighting the potential in everyday life to pursue activities to promote personal wellbeing
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes The five categories highlight types of personal activity that are understood to contribute to an individuals wellbeing
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Examples such as the Maggies Centres make it impossible not to recognise that architectural expression makes a valuable contribution to people's wellbeing
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Aim of the study Having identified the possibility of improving resident wellbeing through support and enablement for daily activities this study explores how the built environment affects the activities of care home residents
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Through gathering a breadth and detail of examples the objective of using this method was to create insight into the spatial factors that affect the activity and therefore wellbeing of care home residents
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes The AEIOU heuristic formed of the five mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive elements of Activity Environment Interaction Object and User provided a structure to capture interactions taking place between residents and the care home building
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes For example noise transmitting through a closed door led a resident to incorrectly think someone was trying to enter whereas an acoustic connection between the kitchen and hall through multiple open doors provided atmosphere and enabled social interactions between staff and residents
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes The increased connection between staff whilst doing tasks and residents led to increased opportunities for social connection
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Congestion was also seen associated with positive effects when recognised as a type of increased spatial interconnectedness resulting in for example serendipitous social encounters
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes In support of previous opinion this study highlights traversability as fundamental to residents wellbeing
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Previous studies have demonstrated a correlation between scales of observed wellbeing and higher levels of gradation of space
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes People watching be it of the activities of other residents staff visitors or the street provided interest
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes CONTRIBUTIONS AND LIMITATIONS This study contributes to an evolving architectural debate generating evidence-based knowledge for designing environments that have the potential to improve the wellbeing of inhabitants
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes The importance of supporting everyday activities in providing routes to improve wellbeing formed the focus of this study
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes CONCLUSIONS As the built environment influences the wellbeing of older people in care homes a holistic understanding of user needs in this context is essential
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Within the context of older peoples care home environments this study provides insight into the effect qualities of the built environment have on activities and wellbeing
View Mc L.J., Harrison I.R. The effects of built environment design on opportunities for wellbeing in care homes Points of interest including personal and environmental objects as well as views provided significant focuses for attention prompts to activity and topics for social interaction
View Venerandi A., Quattrone G., Capra L. City form and well-being: What makes London neighborhoods good places to live? Italian restaurants and wine shops with their oering of quality food might be linked to better eating habits which in turn might positively impact people's well-being; conversely African and Caribbean restaurants which might sell less healthy food might be associated with a worse diet and thus to lower levels of wellbeing
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Drawing on interview data, we discuss volunteers experiences of the AJM in relation to its sociality and affective atmosphere and the role this institution plays in their lives
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum In doing so, we analyse the characteristics which contribute to DIY heritage institutions as spaces for caring, community, and wellbeing
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum The positive effects of volunteering on the wellbeing of older adults have been well documented in scholarly literature
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Pilkington Windsor and Crisp suggested that these benefits are derived from the increased social support that volunteering experiences offer while Greenfield and Marks posited that volunteering mitigates some of the negative effects of role-identity changes that come with ageing such as shifts in employment parental and partner identities implicated in retirement divorce and death
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum As such on an individual level engagement with third places can have positive effects on wellbeing by providing support networks and raising the spirits of participants warding off stress loneliness and isolation
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Below we explore the benefits of engaging in the AJM in terms of how it enhances wellbeing and creates a sense of community for volunteers
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum In this way serious leisure contributes to both individual and community wellbeing
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum While the AJM attracts visitors and volunteers with an interest in jazz music it also enables more general forms of association by being as accommodating accessible and welcoming as possible
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum The collections manager Mel commented that since many volunteers are in poor health going to the museum can act as a tonic what Oldenburg specifically calls a spiritual tonic to make them feel happier and more satisfied with their everyday lives
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum The warm sociality and opportunities for forging friendships are part of what makes third places particularly important for the wellbeing of retired and elderly people
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum observed that participation in third places may remedy the negative effects of such experiences while Greenfield and Marks identified that volunteering similarly operates as a protective factor for the wellbeing of older adults undergoing these role-identity changes
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum The social world of the AJM is therapeutic in that it assists participants in coping with and transcending difficult life experiences and helping to prevent other negative effects
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum The literature on volunteering and wellbeing among older adults has similarly noted the importance of factors like social support to enhancing life satisfaction and benefiting psychological and physical health
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum That is older individuals experience a decrease in social capital with the loss of everyday interaction with work friends partners and children or with the loss of mobility and personal freedom associated with serious illnesses
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum participating in meaningful activity has a positive influence on the mental health of older adults
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Volunteers in the AJM expressed that working in the museum is akin to a hobby or passion helping them to keep busy and giving them a sense of purpose after retirement
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Studies have shown that this kind of ongoing informal learning has positive effects on mental and emotional wellbeing for older adults
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Further Merriam and Kee found that lifelong learning has positive impacts on the wellbeing of the wider community as well
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Learning assists older adults in remaining active healthy and engaged in social life thereby reducing pressure on family and community resources
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum By fostering the AJM as a caring environment it becomes for the volunteers a place for living: an affective social institution whereby practices inspired by an engagement with jazz heritage have unexpected and positive outcomes for those with and without a love for the music being collected
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Volunteering in a DIY heritage institution like the AJM also provides an opportunity for a meaningful retirement by way of the contributions that can be made to the preservation of jazz musics material past: these volunteers understand their work to be of value to the institution but they also recognise the value the institution provides to them in the sense of the supportive community it fosters
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum A sense of community is present in that volunteers feel they belong and matter to the group and that they develop affective bonds a shared emotional connection based on their activities and social interactions
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum Further the AJM is a caring environment benefiting the individuals who engage with it by meeting the needs necessary to support the mental emotional physical and social wellbeing of volunteers and the wider community by preserving localised popular music heritage and by supporting the social lives and health of ageing adults
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum In terms of enhancing the wellbeing of retirees our findings highlighted positive feelings associated with the novelty productivity and learning that underpin work in the AJM
View Cantillon Z., Baker S. DIY Heritage Institutions as Third Places: Caring, Community and Wellbeing Among Volunteers at the Australian Jazz Museum For instance being inclusive of volunteers with disabilities or limited mobility who may need additional assistance from other workers or help with transport to and from the institution will have positive impacts on the emotional wellbeing of these people and further cultivating a caring supportive social world within the institution
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework Specifically, it remains unclear whether individuals with poor mental health experience more barriers to participation
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework Studies have identified that some people experience more barriers to participating than others in particular individuals of lower socio-economic status lower educational attainment and lower income as well as older adults and individuals from an ethnic minority group [-]
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework Finally in relation to motivations individuals with poor mental health frequently have decreased participation in activities such as exercise and socialising [-]
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework Second we analysed whether the relationship between mental health and any identified barriers was explained by specific symptoms of mental illness by contrasting the findings for individuals with depression vs individuals with anxiety
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework Sensitivity analyses The pattern of results was maintained when restricting our definition of depression and anxiety to moderatesevere with the exception that physical opportunities remained a significant factor reported as likely to enhance engagement amongst individuals with anxiety
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework People with depression and anxiety both reported that enhanced feelings of capability would encourage them to engage more with arts activities
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework This was partly explained by differences in physical health in particular higher levels chronic illness and chronic pain in people with poor mental health and lower levels of physical activity in people with depression
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework In considering interventions that could help address these barriers a combination of training and enabling activities that initially engage individuals through taster sessions or demonstrations and then encourage individuals through graded tasks and positive feedback could be explored in future studies to assess if these approaches can help to enhance feelings of capability
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework This suggests that engagement in social activities and arts activities are quite distinct and resonates with research showing independent associations between both social engagement and arts and cultural engagement and various mental and physical health outcomes [-]
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework Conclusion Therefore in concluding this study showed that there are specific patterns of capabilities opportunities and motivations that could influence participation in arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety and proposes interventions that focus on increasing perceived psychological and physical capabilities providing social opportunities and reinforcing both automatic and reflective motivations to engage
View Fancourt D., Baxter L., Lorencatto F. Barriers and enablers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst individuals with depression and anxiety: Quantitative analyses using a behaviour change framework Given the breadth of research showing the benefits of arts activities for improving symptoms of depression and anxiety and enhancing wellbeing future studies are encouraged to explore whether behaviour change interventions could reduce inequities in participation
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes The classes helped participants develop self-confidence, create and strengthen relationships, and encouraged more active lives
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes Developing confidence Participants reported that they exceeded their expectations regarding their achievements and their ability to learn
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes Participants reported a mixture of increased energy and fulfilment
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes As well as integrating new interests into their lives the classes inadvertently encouraged healthier routines
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes [Female years old crafter] A few participants reported an increased use of local facilities and resources and that having a positive experience in the venue encouraged them to go there again for other community events
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes Discussion Overall findings These data corroborate past findings that lifelong learning enhances self-confidence and reported well-being and further establish the claim that creative activities can benefit individuals through providing a sense of achievement and purpose as well as a release from stress
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes The inadvertent transition to more active lifestyles ties with previous findings that adult learning is associated with improved health and greater uptake of health-promoting behaviours such as quitting smoking and taking more exercise
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes By giving individuals a reason to be active adult education classes can have repercussions beyond the classroom that transform participants lifestyles and support better mental and physical health outcomes
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes Social capital The comments collated here support previous findings that adult education tends to enhance social capital through facilitating a sense of belonging promoting tolerance of others and providing participants with the opportunity and skills to extend their social networks
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes Participants felt more confident to take an assertive role in their futures and more integrated into their local communities
View Pearce E. Participants’ perspectives on the social bonding and well-being effects of creative arts adult education classes Moreover the classes allowed them to strengthen ties with close friends and family through sharing their new interests and they enjoyed enhanced well-being linked both to more positive moods and a sense of belonging
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly In elderly people physical cognitive and social functioning decline occurs
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Due to changes in cells and fibrous substances comprising body tissue weight is reduced cartilage tissue is deteriorated and the functional degradation of body organs such as blood vessels and lungs occur)
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly According to one study higher cognitive function in elderly people was associated with lower levels of depression) and depressive symptoms increased in elderly people with cognitive decline acting as a factor lowering the quality of life in elderly people)
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Elderly people are at an increased risk for developing geriatric diseases such as cerebrovascular disease degenerative disease or dementia due to physical and cognitive decline and increased depressive disposition)
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Therefore in order to maintain or improve physical and cognitive functions in elderly people and to induce their active social engagement it is necessary to develop and implement a variety of intervention programs of interest to elderly people
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Although community activities toward normal elderly people have been attempted to prevent their physical and cognitive decline the number of related community activities is still insufficient and the contents are limited to art therapy or music therapy )
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Recreational activities can help elderly people participate in activities and release positive and joyful energy)
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly The results of the present study showed that ADL improved remarkably in both men and women after the intervention cognitive function improved significantly and depression levels decreased significantly
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Depression levels decreased more especially in women
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly DISCUSSION The present study aimed to determine the effects of a combined physical activity recreational activity and art and craft program as an intervention for improving ADL and cognitive function and decreasing depression in elderly people
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Recreational activity improves self-esteem and intimacy through enjoyable interactions with other people
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Looking at the effects of the intervention on depression found in the present study depression was found to significantly decrease in both elderly men and women and was found to markedly decrease especially in women
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly Although depression in elderly people is the greatest influence on subjective wellbeing) and entails negative emotions that can easily occur in elderly people interventions for depression are feasible and depression is thus an integral part of elderly care
View Kim D. The effects of a combined physical activity, recreation, and art and craft program on ADL, cognition, and depression in the elderly The results of the present study provided an opportunity to see that a combined physical activity recreational activity and art and craft program had positive effects on the health of elderly people and can be used as evidence for health management for the elderly in the current situation under which the elderly population is gradually growing
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention Introduction There are few intervention studies that demonstrated linking social participation to lower risk of cognitive decline
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention We examined prospectively the protective effect of a community intervention program promoting social participation on the incidence of cognitive disability
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention Discussion Our study suggests that operating community salons that encourage social interactions, light physical activity, and cognitive activities among older participants may be effective for preventing cognitive decline
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention As shown in Table the results of the multivariate model showed that salon participation frequency was not significantly associated with lower risk of cognitive disability
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention The log-transformed frequency of salon participation was also associated with lower risk of incident cognitive disability
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention In addition the MSMs results indicated that frequency of salon participation was protectively associated with cognitive disability even after adjusting for time-dependent covariates and attrition
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention The association between frequency of salon participation and incident cognitive disability appears to be statistically and clinically important
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention The intervention sought to increase social interaction among seniors through online conversations with trained interviewers for weeks
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention Our study suggests that operating community salons that encourage cognitive activities social interactions and light physical activity among older participants may be effective for preventing cognitive decline
View Hikichi H., Kondo K., Takeda T., Kawachi I. Social interaction and cognitive decline: Results of a 7-year community intervention We also lacked information about incident diabetes mellitus which may have affected both salon participation and cognitive decline
View Pienaar L., Reynolds F. ‘A respite thing’: A qualitative study of a creative arts leisure programme for family caregivers of people with dementia Participants experienced the arts group as providing a sense of freedom and respite, strengthening identity through promoting achievement, offering social support through a collective focus on art- and craft-making and increasing resilience for coping with caring
View Pienaar L., Reynolds F. ‘A respite thing’: A qualitative study of a creative arts leisure programme for family caregivers of people with dementia Recurring themes are that engagement in artmaking reduces stress facilitates contact with more positive emotions increases self-worth and promotes feelings of social connectedness
View Pienaar L., Reynolds F. ‘A respite thing’: A qualitative study of a creative arts leisure programme for family caregivers of people with dementia The reported findings focused primarily on benefits for participants with dementia such as increased cognitive engagement reminiscence new learning and social inclusion